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Shared Leadership Culture at Hancock Lumber

Below are 12 articles and podcasts that describe the outcome and impact of shared leadership in the workplace. Take a look at the excerpts below and click through to learn more. Thank you for joining our mission of shared leadership, dispersed power, and respect for all voices!

 

Work & Life with Stew Friedman

Work & Life with Stew Friedman

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Work and Life Podcast host Stew Friedman about the changes his leadership style and life underwent after losing his voice. Kevin shares how important changing way he approached leadership became and how strengthening the voices of others to help them find their true, authentic self became his life mission. He also talks about how Hancock Lumber has grown exponentially since sharing leadership and power in the organization. Kevin and Stew speak about the faults of having top-down management with power condensed at the top leadership.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

Employee-Centric Versus Capital-Centric Organizations with Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Human Capital Innovations Podcast host Dr. John Westover about shared leadership and employee-centric organizations. They discuss the differences, benefits, and drawbacks of capital-centric organizations and how the shift to shared leadership has impacted Hancock Lumber.

We have been at it for over a decade, so we have very good empirical evidence. Our performance in every category we measure took off. What’s so interesting is, the performance took off when we made the people in the company, not the company, the first priority.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

The 7th Power – Shared Leadership with Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Leadership Re-Imagined host Dr. Jane Lovas about his leadership philosophy and The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. They discuss how his leadership style changed from top-down to shared and dispersed power. He shares his story about how his leadership style so drastically changed and the business implications of this change. Kevin and Jane also discuss supply chains, buying patterns, and how Hancock Lumber hopes to challenge these norms.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.  

The Seventh Power – with Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Being Human host Richard Atherton about his book The Seventh Power. They start by talking about how Kevin lost his voice and the journey that he undertook to Pine Ridge to find inner balance. He explains how this journey led him to the realization that other people’s voices are unique, others are capable of leading, and that leadership should be dispersed. Kevin and Richard also speak about how Hancock Lumber has flourished since his shift in leadership and how other companies can follow suit.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.  

The Breakfast Club Guest: Kevin Hancock

In this radio podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with The Breakfast Club host Mark about his career, his newest book, 48 Whispers, and his mission to empower and strengthen the voices of those around him. During Kevin’s life journey, he has adapted Hancock Lumber to create balance for the employees and ensure that their voices are heard in the company. Kevin also shares how he became involved with the Lakota at Pine Ridge and how this led to his idea of shared leadership.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

Success Made to Last

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with host Rick Tocquigny about shared leadership. Kevin describes how losing the full use of his speaking voice led him to Pine Ridge, where he discovered an entire community that did not feel heard. The two events convinced Kevin that each human is here on earth in a personal quest to find and share their own unique and never to be repeated voice. Unfortunately, across time leaders have done more to restrict the voices of others than to liberate them. Kevin takes these understandings and develops and deploys a new leadership model designed to push power out – away from the corporate center – and give everyone in the organization a leading voice. The result is a high performing corporate model in which business metrics soar as an outcome of a higher calling.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

Heart-Centered Sales Leader

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to host Connie Whitman about his book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. In his book, Kevin shares the philosophy, values and strategies Hancock Lumber Company has embraced on its journey toward becoming an employee-centric company. They also discuss the dangers of being a leader who micromanages a team and the effects this can have on self-worth, work ethic, and stress levels.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.  

Keep It Local Maine: Episode 29

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Keep It Local Maine hosts Kimberly and Todd Regoulinsky about his shared leadership philosophy and creating an employee-centric business model for Hancock Lumber. He shares the journey that brought him to this understanding and how important he feels investing in your employees is for the business and for the employee. He has created a culture where the leadership responsibilities are shared among everyone, meaning that solutions are coming from the people working inside the situations and not just upper management. Kevin can see the confidence that it helps build when everyone’s voice is respected, heard, and valued.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

We Need More From Business and It Starts With Listening

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with People At Work host Bev Attfield about his journey to finding an employee-centric business model and developing a workplace culture where everybody leads and every voice is respected, valued, and heard. Kevin shares how devastating feeling unheard can be, both in the workplace and in the community, and he has developed a way to embrace all voices at Hancock Lumber. By sharing the leadership responsibilities with everyone, Kevin has decentralized the power and spread it across everyone in the company. He shares the impact this has had, economically and socially, and how it can be utilized for any community, not just the workplace.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

We Believe in Shared Leadership

In this article, Kevin Hancock is interviewed about his progressive view on shared leadership. He shares how the lumber industry is often misunderstood and seen as outdated, but he says this is inaccurate. Everything from the technology inside the sawmills to the culture fostered at the company is modern and innovative. Kevin explains more about why the shared leadership, employee-first company model has been so successful.

“The company focuses on the employee experience, and in doing so, positions employees to really create a world-class customer experience.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.

Q&A: Company Culture, Productivity, and Retention: How Does Your Company Measure Up?

The Softwood Forest Products Buyer is reaching out to company leaders across the industry to solicit their input on key issues that impact overall business success. In this publication, Kevin Hancock shares his insights.

“Some organizations collect leadership power into the bureaucratic center, where a few people can make the majority of the decisions for the many. This is the traditional model of business—and government—leadership and, during a period of time in human history, this may have been optimal.

But, that time has passed. of cultures don’t see employees as expendable commodities whose purpose is to serve the company. In fact, these types of cultures flip the traditional script by recognizing that the company exists to serve the people who work there. In a great company, profit is an outcome of a higher calling. That higher calling is the celebration of the human spirit and human capacity. In this way, culture makes all the difference.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.

A Lesson in Leadership From the CEO of One of America’s Oldest Companies

In this interview, Kevin Hancock is asked specifically about his leadership style and how it differs from others. They also speak about how important your authentic voice is and why it is important to listen without judgment. Kevin highlights the importance of hearing voices besides your own, especially as a leader. By engaging others, their voice can start to be heard and they can become leaders as well.

Click here to read the full interview.




Digital Equality

In this article featured in the March 2022 NRLA Lumber Co-Operator, Kevin Hancock writes about digital equality in the workplace. Kevin explores the two groups of employees that the digital age has produced in lumberyards: the group that uses laptops and computers regularly and those that do not. He continues to write about how Hancock Lumber battles against the group with access to computers regularly having more power and knowledge than those who do not. Kevin shares how he has implemented a way to create equality between the two groups.

“I’ve become a strident believer in shared leadership, dispersed power, and respect for all voices. As a result, I oppose any element of our business structure that gives certain groups more power, information, or control over others. The truth is that every role in our company is critical and every individual is capable of leading.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to download a PDF of the article.

 




Voices Carry

Family Business Magazine captures Kevin’s journey and new leadership model in their March 2022 article, Voices Carry. Writer Margaret Sheen tells the story of Kevin losing his voice, the journey he went on to find his voice, and the lessons he learned along the way—and, ultimately, how those lessons translated into a new, modern leadership strategy at his seventh generation family company, Hancock Lumber. Kevin also shares his vision of what being an owner might look like without working directly in the business.

“In a traditional family business model, typically one or two family members really carry the load of responsibility. But in a model where everybody’s leading, it gives everybody more flexibility as well.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.




Architects of Shared Leadership

As part of Hancock Lumber’s HBS Dealer’s national ‘ProDealer of the Year’ recognition, HBSDealer magazine featured the company on the cover of their March 2022 edition. Ken Clark’s “Architects of Shared Leadership” cover story shares their leadership teams’ voices and highlights Hancock Lumber’s success as an employee-centric, shared leadership business—and, how Kevin Hancock’s vision to become one set the company in a new direction.

Click here to read the full article.




The Human Race

This article is written by Kevin Hancock and featured on Creations Magazine. He writes about how work needs to have more meaning and a higher calling, instead of just being work. If work can be more fulfilling to the individual, it will bring about a higher sense of self worth and purpose, which will then begin to affect society.

“Humanity must become more productive, innovative, adaptive, and creative in order to manifest abundance for all. But as we strive toward these goals, we must also bring more love and care for humanity into that competitive arena, so that the economic work of advancing humanity is also spiritually rewarding and uplifting.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.




Write Now with Kevin Hancock

In this article, Kevin Hancock shares his personal journey with writing and becoming an author. He answers questions about why, where, and when he started writing. He shares how he best overcomes writer’s block and what he enjoys doing besides writing. Kevin is able to share about why he is passionate about sharing his writing with people and his mission to help people find their own authentic voice.

“Sharing deeply personal experiences, learnings, and musings as a means to explore themes of relevance to all of humanity always feels deeply meaningful. When we open ourselves and become vulnerable we encourage others to do the same. When we look inward for truth and path we make it safe for others to do the same. Knowing that the writings of one person also belong to collective consciousness of all humans is motivating.”  – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.




Center of All That Is

In this article, the Center of All That Is whisper is a featured excerpt on the Braided Way blog. This whisper, originally written in Kevin Hancock’s 48 Whispers, delves into the concept of center. Kevin writes in a quote from Black Elk, who understood that center is within ourselves, and that this is the path to sustained peace.

Click here to read the full article.




48 Whispers Q&A with Deborah Kalb

In this interview, Kevin Hancock speaks with Deborah Kalb about his book 48 Whispers. She asks questions to learn more about what inspired Kevin to write this book, what keeps drawing him back to Pine Ridge, and the messages for readers in the book. Kevin finishes by explaining “I have come to dedicate my work to the mission of strengthening the voices of others. Leadership in the 21st century must be about distributing power, not collecting it.”

Click here to read the entire interview.




Interviews with Bob Greenberg, Part 3

In this video, Kevin Hancock speaks about how he became a champion for shared leadership and dispersed power. When Kevin lost the power of his voice, he turned to others for their ideas so he could speak less. He also speaks about how he found the Lakota tribe on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and how he connected with them through the loss of voice. He speaks about his own personal learnings, specifically about shared leadership and dispersed power. He finishes by sharing how Hancock Lumber has flourished from this new business model.

Click here to watch the full video.




Interviews with Bob Greenberg, Part 2

In this interview, Kevin Hancock speaks about how teachers make a difference. In his example, he talks about his science teacher Eugene Whitney, who made each individual in the classroom feel heard and special. This feeling has stuck with Kevin since then and is memorable for him.

Click here to watch the full video.




Interviews with Bob Greenberg, Part 1

In this interview, Kevin Hancock speaks about how he found the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and how the moments he spent there helped him and inspired him to write 48 Whispers. He shares that the thoughts and pictures that he takes while there have helped him find inner peace, a way of leading without overusing his voice, and connect with nature. Kevin explains how he could connect with the Lakota tribe because they, too, felt their voices had been weakened and taken away.

Click here to watch the full video.




SA Examiner – 48 Whispers Book Review

In a book review done by the SA Examiner, Kevin Hancock’s newest book, 48 Whispers, is given an examination through the eyes of blogger Sandra Cruz. She gives examples of her favorite whispers, and writes that “inspirational books do not have to be encyclopedia sized or full of complicated psychological or religious subject matter to be effective in reaching out to people. Kevin Hancock’s musings come off as deeply spiritual and satisfying while the pictures are beautiful, calming, and tell a story all on their own … [48 Whispers] makes for an exceptional coffee table book or gift for a loved one this holiday season.”

Click here to read the full article.




Midwest Book Review: 48 Whispers

In this blog article, 48 Whispers appears in Helen Dumont’s bookshelf to be reviewed. She writes a synopsis of the book for her readers, describing why Kevin Hancock journeyed to Pine Ridge over 20 times. Helen writes in her review that “[48 Whispers] is especially and unreservedly recommended for personal, professional, community, college, and university library Contemporary American Photography collections.”

Click here to read the full article.




Sincerely Stacie Feature – 48 Whispers

In this article, Stacie Gorkow, owner of the blog Sincerely Stacie, highlights 48 Whispers is on her “Books That Came My Way in August 2021” post. She gives a small preview of the book and what it’s about in her post. She writes reviews on recently read books and makes recommendations.

Click here to see her full article.




We Believe in Shared Leadership

In this article, Kevin Hancock is interviewed about his progressive view on shared leadership. He shares how the lumber industry is often misunderstood and seen as outdated, but he says this is inaccurate. Everything from the technology inside the sawmills to the culture fostered at the company is modern and innovative. Kevin explains more about why the shared leadership, employee-first company model has been so successful.

“The company focuses on the employee experience, and in doing so, positions employees to really create a world-class customer experience.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.




Book Spin Feature – 48 Whispers

In this article, Kevin Hancock’s newest book, 48 Whispers, is highlighted as a book in the “To Be Read” stack. In this small overview of the book, it highlights Kevin’s personal journey of healing and how he found the Lakota tribe at Pine Ridge. It also brings his shared leadership philosophy forward and the influence losing his own voice had upon this new business model.

Click here to read the full article.




Q&A: Company Culture, Productivity, and Retention: How Does Your Company Measure Up?

The Softwood Forest Products Buyer is reaching out to company leaders across the industry to solicit their input on key issues that impact overall business success. In this publication, Kevin Hancock shares his insights.

“Some organizations collect leadership power into the bureaucratic center, where a few people can make the majority of the decisions for the many. This is the traditional model of business—and government—leadership and, during a period of time in human history, this may have been optimal. But, that time has passed.

In the 21st century, organizations that disperse power, share leadership, and give everyone a voice are going to win because they recognize and celebrate the capabilities of everyone on the team. These types of cultures don’t see employees as expendable commodities whose purpose is to serve the company. In fact, these types of cultures flip the traditional script by recognizing that the company exists to serve the people who work there. In a great company, profit is an outcome of a higher calling. That higher calling is the celebration of the human spirit and human capacity. In this way, culture makes all the difference.” Read the complete interview here >>>




Leaders of Lumber: Kevin Hancock

In this article, Kevin Hancock speaks about how important company culture and sharing leadership are at Hancock Lumber. Kevin explains how his journey to Pine Ridge opened his eyes to how narrow his leadership focus was. He was the largest voice in the room and after losing his voice, he could no longer be the same. When Kevin began opening the floor to other voices, he found a significant change in the way the company was able to operate.

“When a company is safe, people will relax and focus on helping the organization improve. The politics, the fear, and the distrust simply dissolve. Ego dissolves as well. People are allowed to just be themselves.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.




Five Steps We Must Take To Truly Create An Inclusive, Representative, and Equitable Society

In this interview, Kevin Hancock reflects upon how traditional views of leadership have caused disruption, inequality, and misrepresentation throughout history. “Leaders of established organizations have often ‘over-reached.’ By this, I mean that those with the most power often abuse it and go too far.” He goes on to say that the quest for equality and diversity depend in part upon a change in leadership style, to one where voices are heard and respected. At the end of the article, Kevin is asked to share his five steps to help create a new style of society.

#1. Make peace within yourself. 

#2. Recognize that social change requires everyone to make a move. 

#3. Listen for understanding, not judgment.

#4. Rethink ‘winning.’ 

#5. Change the world right beside you. 

Click here to read the full article.




COVID Response Strategies

The Wall Street Journal 8/24/2020 Article “New Thinking on Covid Lockdowns: They’re Overly Blunt and Costly”

This is the most thoughtful, data driven, reflective, and objective considerations of potential strategic responses designed to achieve maximum and balanced health, economic, and social salvation from COVID that I have read. –Kevin Hancock

  • “400 million jobs have been lost world wide.”
  • “We are on the cusp of an economic catastrophe. We can avoid the worst of that catastrophe by being disciplined.” – James Stock. Harvard economist.
  • “The economic pain from the pandemic mostly comes not from sick people but from healthy people trying not to get sick.”
  • “There have been few attempts to truly define the goal.”
  • “Nursing homes account for 0.6% of the population but 45% of Covid fatalities. Better isolating those residents would have saved many lives at little economic cost.”
  • “By contrast, fewer children have died this year from COVID-19 than from flu.”
  • “And studies in Sweden, where most schools stayed open, and the Netherlands, where they reopened in May, found teachers at no greater risk than the overall population.”
  • “If schools don’t reopen until next January, McKinsey & Co. estimates, low-income children will have lost a year of education, which it says translates into 4% lower lifetime earnings.”
  • “Bars, restaurants, and casinos accounted for 32% of infections traced in Louisiana.”
  • “Masks may be the most effective intervention of all.”

The thesis is that more targeted strategies would have saved / and still have the potential to save / more lives AND simultaneously create far less social and economic disruption.

This article was refreshing because, for me, it transcended politics. When was the last time you over-heard or participated in a non-political / calm / rational discussion of potential COVID management strategies with data and balance for all priorities? When I realized a couple months ago that our national Covid response would be the primary campaign debate theme in November I knew it would result in polarized thought limitations. Winning strategies usually reside in the gray middle but our politics live on the extremes and it’s costly.




Be the Change That You Wish to See in the World

In this interview with Thrive Global, Kevin Hancock shares the story about how he came to visit Pine Ridge for the first time and the life lessons he learned along the way. Kevin’s shared leadership and voice empowerment ideas have helped him create a new employee-centric model for Hancock Lumber. Kevin realized there are a lot of ways for people to lose their voice, but he is determined to create a company where every employee is heard.

Click here to read the full article.




Unstoppable: How Kevin Hancock of Hancock Lumber was Able to Thrive Despite Spasmodic Dysphonia

In this interview, Kevin Hancock talks about how he was able to find positivity and strength through his diagnosis of Spasmodic Dysphonia (SD). By changing his mindset and prospective, Kevin was able to see his diagnosis as a gift which allowed him to begin listening to the ideas of others. When he began listening, he heard ideas that showed him that each employee had the capability of being a leader. His leadership style became one that fostered the growth of others.

Click here to read the full article.




Rethinking Employee Off-boarding

In this article, Kevin writes about how employee off-boarding can be a different process when the company’s culture is one that fosters personal growth and shares leadership. Human Resources professionals should rework their thoughts to maximize the well-being of those employed at the company. Instead of treating an off-boarded employee as someone to close a folder on, HR can take a role of helping facilitate finding a more engaging and meaningful transition.

“The fact that a specific job was not an optimal fit for an individual potentially now becomes something to honor and celebrate. ‘Ok, so we’ve found an occupation that does not energize you or leave you with a deep sense of fulfillment. This is progress, not failure. Let’s seize this moment to think about what types of work experiences might captivate you.'” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.




Recent Press Updates: Featuring The Seventh Power

Hello! Just sharing the following podcast and op-ed piece that I wrote on the importance of shared leadership, dispersed power, and respect for all voices. If you like them, please share!
Thank you,

 

 

  • The Enlightenment for Change interview with Connie Whitman was one of my favorite podcasts to date! Connie was a great host–our discussion was deep and really fun.

 

 

 




Ninety Days in the Heart of America

In this article, Kevin Hancock writes about how the COVID pandemic showed how American citizens unified, persevered, and took control of their safety measures. Instead of chaos, America unified and was able to work together to save lives and slow the spread. Kevin also touches on how the coronavirus was not the only sickness Americans battled in the spring of 2020. He notes that an old foe, racism, was also magnified. To truly repair, rebuild, and move from racist systems, people must become leaders.

Click here to read the full article.




A Lesson in Leadership From the CEO of One of America’s Oldest Companies

In this interview, Kevin Hancock is asked specifically about his leadership style and how it differs from others. They also speak about how important your authentic voice is and why it is important to listen without judgment. Kevin highlights the importance of hearing voices besides your own, especially as a leader. By engaging others, their voice can start to be heard and they can become leaders as well.

Click here to read the full article.




Managing Less, Not More

In this article, Kevin Hancock writes about the challenges of training managers and supervisors to manage and supervise less. After realizing that in nature power is dispersed, Kevin uses these experiences to change the operational strategy of Hancock Lumber. By encouraging every employee to lead, the managers and supervisors would not be managing and supervising the same amount as before. He shares the strategies and tactics used to shift the organization from one model to another and the results he has seen so far.

Click here to read the full article.




Book Review: The Seventh Power

This article is a complete review of Kevin Hancock’s newest book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey into the Business of Shared Leadership. Written by Margo Kelly, this review highlights the way leadership lessons are intertwined in the narrative to create an engaging story. Margo shares how she felt Kevin’s writing stimulated her own thoughts and created a dialogue within herself. To summarize Margo’s review, she writes “I LOVE IT!!!”

Click here to read the full article.




6 Ways HR Needs to Evolve Post the COVID-19 Crisis

In this article, editor Puja Lalwani speaks to HR leaders, including Kevin Hancock, about how to evolve after the COVID crisis. In Kevin’s section of this article, they speak about the importance of communication. HR and leadership must communicate in crisis situations, but Kevin takes it one step further.

“Leaders should prioritize authentic, safe, and vulnerable communication with the members of their company or community at all times. The goal is to make it safe for people to express how they actually feel and share what they honestly think. This becomes especially important in a time of crisis, but if that’s not the normal approach, it will be impossible to just ‘turn it on’ conditionally and temporarily.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.




How to Make Shared Leadership a Reality

Article published in the April 2020 issue of Stanford Social Innovation Review.  Click to read complete article

“Having found a piece of my own authentic voice, I wanted to help others do the same, and a lumber company in Maine became an unlikely platform where this could occur. The new goal: create a socially transformative work culture for the 21st century in which employee engagement soars because everyone feels authentically heard.”—Kevin Hancock 

Dispersing power is not hard to do. It’s about learning how to defer to the most fundamental laws of nature. But creating a culture where every voice matters does require discipline and intentionality. Humanity’s modern thirst for deep change is real, but to get there, the established organizational rules must be thoughtfully deconstructed. At Hancock Lumber, deepening employee engagement is our number-one goal. We believe that if we get that right, everything else we care about will materialize. Click to read complete article




Business Community Building: We’re All in it Together

In the Workable article “Business Community Building: We’re All in it Together,” Kevin Hancock is interviewed among other business leaders about the importance of clarity in the COVID-19 pandemic. Kevin speaks about the need of the company to follow the lead of the people connected to it. This unification of employees creates a deep connection. The article goes on to interview others on the same topic, highlighting the strength of togetherness during this unique, difficult time.

To read the full article, click here.




How to Talk to Your Boss About Your New Work-From-Home Challenges

In this article, Kevin weighs in on how to communicate with your manager about balancing work and family. During the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of people found themselves working from home and finding the work/life balance very difficult. Kevin highlights that no one is alone in this new struggle. Everyone is in this together and experiencing true disruption. Speaking to your boss about your newfound difficulties is an important part of drawing boundaries.

“Bosses need to hear the truth about what employees are feeling and it’s a disservice to yourself to keep your personal needs on the sideline.” – Kevin Hancock

To read the full article, click here.




Leadership Power is Meant to be Shared and Dispersed

In this article, Kevin Hancock is interviewed about how important sharing leadership power is and why he believes it was meant to be dispersed and shared among the tribe. He cautions against consolidating power, saying that “across time, those who have the most power have often gone too far. Over-reaching ultimately however collapses back upon the people who do it.” 

Kevin’s experiences have brought him to many conclusions, each of which has fostered change in his life.

“Everyone is sacred. Everyone has a unique voice and an essential perspective to share. Leadership is at its best when everybody does it.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.




Keep Dreaming, America

In this article, Kevin Hancock reflects on the notion that the American dream is dying. Kevin breaks down the pieces that make up the American dream and evaluates them based upon the previous generation. He compares how he has felt the employees at his company, Hancock Lumber, are achieving their American dream. Finally, he leaves a thought: to gain the American dream, we must win together, dream together, and achieve together.

Click here to read the full article.




7 Signs That Say You Have the Mindset of a Great Leader

Centralized power and decision-making control is out. Shared leadership is in.

To read the full article, click here.



This Family Lumber Company Has Survived 11 Major Economic Downturns. Here’s How

Hancock Lumber learned how to sell global and act local.

In this article, Kevin Hancock speaks with Steve Goldberg about the challenges that Hancock Lumber has faced with economic tides since 1848. While looking at the reasons that Hancock Lumber has been able to survive these hard times, he discusses that he recently started looking at the company model differently, putting employees as the priority.

“What I like to say now, to borrow a piece of Maine slang, is that the customer comes a wicked-close second.” – Kevin Hancock

To read the full article, click here.




Seeing The Deeper Lessons of Coronavirus

In this article, Kevin Hancock writes about the lessons that the coronavirus uncovered. He writes about how during the pandemic, people were forced to slow down and begin looking at aspects of their lives that were not normally. By seeing that people are looking inward, Kevin notes that he hopes it will bring a deeper sense of community and connectivity between people, much like what he saw on the Pine Ridge reservation.

Click here to read the full article. 




An Excerpt From The Seventh Power

This article is an excerpt from Kevin Hancock’s newest book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. It begins with his trip to Kiev, where Kevin is pensive about how millions of humans were sacrificed so that the success of the center might be advanced. It brings about a reflection into his own company and how he hopes to bring about a stronger work/life balance, inner growth and development, and job satisfaction to his employees.

Click here to read the full article.




In Nature, Power Is Dispersed

In this article, Kevin Hancock writes about how he came to the understanding that in nature, power is dispersed. He discusses how this simple notion changed everything he based his company around and how he sees the world. By dispersing power, everyone can become a leader. Kevin also explains how he ended up taking his spiritual journey to the Pine Ridge reservation and took walks in the desert.

Click here to read the full article. 




Culture Makes The Difference

Article by Kevin Hancock, published in March 2020 on the Young Upstarts website. Young Upstarts is an online business resource for startup entrepreneurs, small business owners, idea people, and intrapreneurs seeking change within their organization.

What differentiates companies?  It’s generally not products, services, facilities, or equipment. Years ago, I would have said it was people who make the difference and separate companies. But I have come to realize that’s not the whole story. Certain companies may think they have the ‘best people’, but the truth is, great people are everywhere — the planet is filled with them. So, if products don’t make the difference, and great people are everywhere, then what separates one organization from another?

The answer is culture. Culture makes the difference. An organization’s culture either creates an environment where great people can flourish, or an environment where people are frustrated, held back, or stymied.

Click here to read the full article.




Culture Makes the Difference

In this article, Kevin Hancock writes about how company culture plays a significant role in differentiating one business from another. To Kevin, culture is fostered heavily by who controls the power of the entity. If the power is consolidated at the top, employees may begin to feel unheard and easily replaced. In cultures where leadership and power is dispersed, employees begin finding their true voice and feel a higher level of engagement and satisfaction.

“Work should serve the people who do it in more than just economic ways. Work should be a place where humans flourish—where people learn, lead, and grow. If the employees of a company have an exceptional experience, they will ensure that customers thrive and will protect and grow their company with loyalty and pride.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.




Leadership and Lumber: An Interview With Kevin Hancock

In this interview, Kevin Hancock speaks about different themes in his newest book, The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. He speaks about what the Seventh Power is, how he came to learn about it, and how he incorporates his lessons into his daily life. He also shares the best advice he was ever given and near the end, Kevin is asked to give three tips to leaders.

  1. Lose the ego. 
  2. Get out of your lane.  
  3. Listen for understanding, not judgment.

Click here to read the full article.




    A Butt-Kicking Project to Overcome the Drain of Talkative Leadership

    This article highlights the downfalls that talkative leaders often use to justify their conversation monopoly and the negative impacts it can have on culture and engagement. It also gives an exercise that leaders can partake in to find out how often they take over entire conversations. Kevin Hancock’s story is shared through a video interview about how losing his voice changed his entire leadership style.

    To read the full article and watch the interview, click here.




    Putting Work Back In It’s Place

    In this article, Kevin Hancock writes about the importance of having a proper work/life balance. He highlights the difficulties of keeping work weeks to forty hours in the manufacturing industry, but admits there is no denying the benefits of having a balanced life.

    “Today I encourage all of the 525 people in our company to expand their lives beyond work and to invest more energy in pursuits that spark their hearts. While being successful at our jobs is essential for a healthy society, life is bigger than work. Today’s complex world needs CEOs who see the big picture of a balanced life, and use advancements at the workplace to free human capacity, not consume it.” – Kevin Hancock

    To read the full article, click here.




    Culture Makes the Difference: Great People are Everywhere, Great Cultures Aren’t

    Written by Kevin Hancock, “Culture Makes the Difference” explores the differences between companies and what are the key differentials between them.

    “Culture makes the difference.  An organization’s culture either creates an environment where great people can flourish, or an environment where people are frustrated, held back, or stymied. 

    What makes one corporate culture different from another?  To me, it’s all about control and where it lives.  Some organizations collect leadership power into the bureaucratic center, where a few people can make the majority of the decisions for the many.  This is the traditional model of business—and government—leadership and, during a period of time in human history, this may have been optimal.  But, that time has passed.” – Kevin Hancock 

    To read the full article, click here.




    Advocating For Shared Leadership

    In this interview, Kevin Hancock speaks with host Helene Stelian about the importance of sharing leadership and finding your authentic voice. Kevin’s goal is to find his own authentic voice and create a company that fosters the culture that allows others to do the same. By creating an employee-centric company, Kevin hopes to achieve this dream. He also shares his journey to Pine Ridge and how his time there transformed the way he thinks about his own leadership style.

    Click here to read the full article.




    How Saying Less Can Empower Others to Say More

    In this article, Kevin Hancock writes about how journey to finding that by saying less, he is empowering others to speak more. By sharing the leadership responsibility with many, instead of consolidating in one place, Kevin has seen tremendous growth in those around him and the business he runs, Hancock Lumber. Once employees became engaged and felt more confidence, they began flourishing. Kevin writes that this is the path for the future, not only for Hancock Lumber, but one he hopes will spread to other communities as well.

    Click here to read the full article.




    The Age of Localism

    In this article, Kevin Hancock speaks about shared leadership, employee engagement, and employee-centric company structures.

    “Humans will always benefit from banding together to create value and solve problems. But institutions will need to alter the ways they engage with the world. Take corporations, for example, where employees have historically existed to serve the company. This self-centered model is in decline. It will be replaced by a new corporate relationship in which the company understands that its real purpose is to be valuable and meaningful to the people who work there. I call this reoriented corporation an ’employee-centric company.'” – Kevin Hancock

    To read the full article, click here.




    True Profitability and Productivity Come From Striving for a Bigger Social Goal

    This article is an excerpt from Kevin Hancock’s new book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership.

    “At Hancock Lumber, we grow trees, but that is not our core objective. We make lumber, but that is not our primary purpose. We manage logistics, but that is not our most important task. Our one big goal is to add value to the lives of the people who work at Hancock Lumber. Work should add more than just economic value to the lives of the people who operate our company.” – Kevin Hancock

    To read the full article, click here.




    The Age of Localism

    In this article, Kevin Hancock explores the beginning of the age of localism; the idea that localized decision-making, rule-setting, and self-organizing will be the new pathways towards excellence. Kevin also discusses what will happen to larger companies in the future and the role that they play in our lives.

    “Take corporations, for example, where employees have historically existed to serve the company. This self-centered model is in decline. It will be replaced by a new corporate relationship in which the company understands that its real purpose is to be valuable and meaningful to the people who work there. I call this reoriented corporation an ’employee-centric company.'” – Kevin Hancock

    To read the full article, click here.




    How Losing His Voice Taught a Maine CEO to Give Workers More Say

    In this article by the Bangor Daily News, Kevin Hancock shares how his journey to Pine Ridge changed the way he thinks about power, leadership, and the human spirit. By rethinking the way he led Hancock Lumber, Kevin was able to give a voice to his employees. He found that they had the answers and ideas needed to run their daily activities. From this change, the company expanded to new heights and weathered unthinkable market volatility.

    Click here to read the full article.




    5 Clear Signs You’re Not An Authentic Leader

    In the article, Kevin Hancock’s core belief that leaders should listen more than speak is highlighted as an important indicator of being an authentic leader. Authentic leaders are naturally those who disperse and share leadership with those around them. Author Erin Hatzikostas says that when you share leadership and listen to others, “you’ll be amazed at how smart other people are.”

    To read the full article, click here.




    Kevin Hancock Interview with Natfluence

    In this interview, Kevin Hancock speaks about motivators, success strategies, and the leadership style within Hancock Lumber. He shares his daily reflection strategies, as well as his daily routine. Some fun facts about Kevin?

    • Where do you enjoy getting lost? With the buffalo and the golden grass deep in the backcountry of Wind Cave National Park in the Black Hills.
    • What drink do you need to get through the day? Diet Coke.
    • Most used App/Favorite Instagram Account? I like to minimize social media. Life is better in person!
    • What should everyone try at least once? A solo trip to a place that speaks to your heart.

    Click here to read the full interview.




    Governor Mills Nominates Individuals for Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission

    May 24, 2019 – PRESS RELEASE

    Governor Janet Mills announced today that she has nominated six people to serve on the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission. The Governor nominated John Cashwell, Robert Checkoway, James Cote, Kevin Hancock, former Senator Michael Pearson and former Senator Richard Rosen to serve on the Commission, an inter-governmental entity charged in part with reviewing the social, economic and legal relationship between Maine Tribes and the State.

    “The Maine Indian-Tribal State Commission has the potential to improve and strengthen the relationship between the State and Maine Tribes,” said Governor Mills. “In nominating these qualified individuals, my Administration is taking a step forward in reinvigorating the Commission and empowering it to become a forum for substantive communication, problem solving, and dispute resolution.”

    The Commission is composed of six members appointed by the State, two by the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, two by the Passamaquoddy Tribe, and two by the Penobscot Indian Nation. The thirteenth, who is the chairperson, is selected by the other twelve. The Commission has not had a full slate of members since 2013.

    All state nominations to MITSC are subject to review by the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary and final confirmation by the Maine State Senate.

    Governor Mills’ Nominations to the Maine Indian-Tribal State Commission:

    For appointment, John Cashwell of Bangor has served as president of Black River LLC since 2008. He previously served as Director of the Maine Forest Service from 1987 to 1992 and is a United States Army veteran. Cashwell also previously served as a Councilmember and as Mayor in both Calais and Bangor.

    For appointment, Robert Checkoway of Freeport, a retired attorney, formerly served as Assistant US Trustee for the US Department of Justice, responsible for the administration of all bankruptcy cases in Maine. Checkoway also formerly served as Assistant US Trustee at Preti, Flaherty and Beliveau and formerly as Associate Attorney at Skelton, Taintor & Abbott. Checkoway is a 1976 Maine School of Law graduate.

    For appointment, James Cote of Farmington is a public affairs consultant with Bernstein Shur and specializes in policies relating to natural resources, energy, and economic development. Cote formerly served as president and CEO of Associated Builders and Contractors of Maine and as Director of Communications and Government Relations for the Maine Forest Products Council.

    For appointment, Kevin Hancock of Casco has served as CEO of Hancock Lumber since 1991 and is the founder of Seventh Power, a non-profit organization that works to support Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Hancock is the author of the award winning novel Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse and is the recipient of the Ed Muskie Access to Justice Award, Boy Scouts of America Distinguished Citizen Award, and the Habitat for Humanity Spirit of Humanity Award. Hancock is a graduate of Bowdoin College.

    For appointment, the Honorable Michael Pearson of Enfield, a retired school teacher, formerly served as Old Town City Councilmember and as state representative and state senator, including as chair of the Appropriations Committee, representing the people of Old Town and Indian Island for more than twenty years.

    For appointment, the Honorable Richard Rosen of Bucksport served as the Commissioner of the Department of Administration and Financial Services from 2014-2017 and for fourteen years as state representative and state senator. During his time in the Legislature, Rosen served as Senate Chair and Ranking House Member of the Appropriations and Financial Affairs Committee and as Assistant Senate Republican Leader. Rosen is also the former owner and operator of Rosen’s, a clothing and footwear retailer in Bucksport.




    Americans Should Set Example for New Leader

    In this article published by the Portland Press Herald, Kevin Hancock writes about how Americans can and should set examples for the newly elected President. As Kevin’s leadership style evolved into one of employee leadership, he mentions instances where he has become concerned with the lack of communication coming from the leaders in government. However, if we set an example for how relationships should be treated, we can become unified and stronger than ever.

    “Hold a loving hand out to everyone around you and carry on. Your children, your neighbors and the world will see what we – the 324 million – do every day as the definition of who we are. In the Aquarian age, the voice of the orchestra trumps the voice of the soloist.” – Kevin Hancock

    To read the full article, click here.




    Strengthening the Voices of Others

    In this article, Kevin Hancock shares his story about losing his voice and how his leadership style adapted to this major obstacle. By listening more to others, Kevin is able to preserve his voice and create a new employee-centric culture at Hancock Lumber.

    “Leadership is about doing less, not more. It is about restraint. It is about holding the power but not using it. It’s about listening without judging or correcting. It is about being connected and aware of how others feel.” – Kevin Hancock

    To read the full article, click here.




    Not 4 Sale in Big Blend Magazine

    In this article, Kevin Hancock’s book Not 4 Sale is introduced, giving a look into the reasons for Kevin’s journey to Pine Ridge and the ideas that began afterwards. After a series of solo trips to Pine Ridge, Kevin began to realize that we are all one tribe. This led to him rethinking the structure and future of Hancock Lumber to ensure that the environment fostered personal, inward growth of the tribes around him.

    Click here to read the full article.




    Life Lessons Lead to LBM Changes at Hancock Lumber

    Kevin Hancock’s journey of self discovery after losing his voice is brought to life in his new book Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse. Kevin’s quest brought him to the realization that the structure of Hancock Lumber could drastically change and improve employee engagement and job satisfaction.

    “I thought, what if this came to an organization where everyone led and everyone had a voice and their opinion and perspectives mattered. That would be more powerful than an organization where just a few people led. Hancock Lumber has always been an organization where people’s opinions were valued, but we have taken that to another level. ” – Kevin Hancock

    To read the full article, click here.




    Leading by Listening

    In this article, Kevin Hancock is interviewed about his journey to finding a new leadership style by listening more to others. Kevin’s new management initiative helps bring Hancock Lumber to new highs, by creating a lean structure and maximizing employee engagement. They also talk about his new book, Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse.

    To read the full article, click here.




    Hancock Lumber’s Kevin Hancock on Growing After the Recession

    Kevin Hancock is interviewed in this article about Hancock Lumber’s growth after the economic recession. During this time, Kevin lost his voice, which creates a new leadership style centered around listening to others more than speaking.

    “I learned that leadership is about doing less, not more. It was letting people who have responsibility own their issues and opportunities to learn and make decisions.” – Kevin Hancock

    To read the full article, click here.




    A Path to Change

    In this article Kevin Hancock is interviewed about his new business leadership ideas and how dispersing power amongst all employees of Hancock Lumber has created a more successful company.

    “The more I held back and left space for others, the more everyone grabbed that space, embraced responsibility, took ownership, enjoyed making decisions, and ran with it. There were lots of people who could help lead our company, everyone in fact.” – Kevin Hancock 
    To read the full article, click here.



    A Story I Had To Tell

    In this article, Kevin Hancock recalls his first trip to the Pine Ridge Reservation and how this journey opened his eyes to life in the tribe. At a time in his life where Kevin was losing the ability to speak, he stumbled upon a tribe of people who had felt that their voices had been lost too. The feeling of being connected, of shared kinship, was reawakened in this time amongst the tribe.

    “The point is, what do you want to do with your life? You don’t have to travel thousands of miles to help others, it may be right in front of you. This experience for me has been a call to be connected with myself. There is this energy that has been brought to life within me to help others.” – Kevin Hancock

    To read the full article, click here.