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Warriors for Peace

On this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Warriors for Peace host Donna Seebo about his book Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse. They speak about the challenges that are prevalent at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and what Kevin has done to help the community there. He also speaks about his journeys to Pine Ridge and the projects they have completed together. Finally, they speak about how Kevin’s view on leadership has changed throughout his life and what this means for his tribes.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.




Strength For Your Purpose Podcast

Strength for your PurposeIn this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Strength For Your Purpose Podcast host Dr. Phil Finemore about shared leadership and dispersed power. They discuss Kevin’s journey and how he came to his philosophy that power should be dispersed. Kevin shares the outcomes for the company and the employees who work for Hancock Lumber. Finally, they discuss the ways that other people can strengthen and empower the voices of those around them – whether at work, or beyond.

“Every single person in our company knows more about their job than I do. They live it every day. So, to really make it safe for people to own their part of the company and lead it and improve it.. when you think about it, it makes a lot of sense.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Click here to watch a video of the podcast interview.




Safe Space Podcast

Safe SpaceIn this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Safe Space host Franco Lombardo about successfully running a business without speaking. They discuss Kevin’s journey, from losing his voice to finding it again and the lessons he learned along the way. Kevin talks about the successes gained from listening, empowering voices, and sharing leadership throughout the organization. He also encourages other business leaders to try dispersing power. The results can improve the lives of employees, increase employee engagement, create a higher level of customer service, and allow the company to thrive.

Click here to listen to part 1 of the podcast.

Click here to listen to part 2 of the podcast.




Shared Leadership Culture at Hancock Lumber

Below are 12 articles and podcasts that describe the outcome and impact of shared leadership in the workplace. Take a look at the excerpts below and click through to learn more. Thank you for joining our mission of shared leadership, dispersed power, and respect for all voices!

 

Work & Life with Stew Friedman

Work & Life with Stew Friedman

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Work and Life Podcast host Stew Friedman about the changes his leadership style and life underwent after losing his voice. Kevin shares how important changing way he approached leadership became and how strengthening the voices of others to help them find their true, authentic self became his life mission. He also talks about how Hancock Lumber has grown exponentially since sharing leadership and power in the organization. Kevin and Stew speak about the faults of having top-down management with power condensed at the top leadership.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

Employee-Centric Versus Capital-Centric Organizations with Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Human Capital Innovations Podcast host Dr. John Westover about shared leadership and employee-centric organizations. They discuss the differences, benefits, and drawbacks of capital-centric organizations and how the shift to shared leadership has impacted Hancock Lumber.

We have been at it for over a decade, so we have very good empirical evidence. Our performance in every category we measure took off. What’s so interesting is, the performance took off when we made the people in the company, not the company, the first priority.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

The 7th Power – Shared Leadership with Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Leadership Re-Imagined host Dr. Jane Lovas about his leadership philosophy and The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. They discuss how his leadership style changed from top-down to shared and dispersed power. He shares his story about how his leadership style so drastically changed and the business implications of this change. Kevin and Jane also discuss supply chains, buying patterns, and how Hancock Lumber hopes to challenge these norms.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.  

The Seventh Power – with Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Being Human host Richard Atherton about his book The Seventh Power. They start by talking about how Kevin lost his voice and the journey that he undertook to Pine Ridge to find inner balance. He explains how this journey led him to the realization that other people’s voices are unique, others are capable of leading, and that leadership should be dispersed. Kevin and Richard also speak about how Hancock Lumber has flourished since his shift in leadership and how other companies can follow suit.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.  

The Breakfast Club Guest: Kevin Hancock

In this radio podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with The Breakfast Club host Mark about his career, his newest book, 48 Whispers, and his mission to empower and strengthen the voices of those around him. During Kevin’s life journey, he has adapted Hancock Lumber to create balance for the employees and ensure that their voices are heard in the company. Kevin also shares how he became involved with the Lakota at Pine Ridge and how this led to his idea of shared leadership.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

Success Made to Last

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with host Rick Tocquigny about shared leadership. Kevin describes how losing the full use of his speaking voice led him to Pine Ridge, where he discovered an entire community that did not feel heard. The two events convinced Kevin that each human is here on earth in a personal quest to find and share their own unique and never to be repeated voice. Unfortunately, across time leaders have done more to restrict the voices of others than to liberate them. Kevin takes these understandings and develops and deploys a new leadership model designed to push power out – away from the corporate center – and give everyone in the organization a leading voice. The result is a high performing corporate model in which business metrics soar as an outcome of a higher calling.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

Heart-Centered Sales Leader

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to host Connie Whitman about his book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. In his book, Kevin shares the philosophy, values and strategies Hancock Lumber Company has embraced on its journey toward becoming an employee-centric company. They also discuss the dangers of being a leader who micromanages a team and the effects this can have on self-worth, work ethic, and stress levels.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.  

Keep It Local Maine: Episode 29

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Keep It Local Maine hosts Kimberly and Todd Regoulinsky about his shared leadership philosophy and creating an employee-centric business model for Hancock Lumber. He shares the journey that brought him to this understanding and how important he feels investing in your employees is for the business and for the employee. He has created a culture where the leadership responsibilities are shared among everyone, meaning that solutions are coming from the people working inside the situations and not just upper management. Kevin can see the confidence that it helps build when everyone’s voice is respected, heard, and valued.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

We Need More From Business and It Starts With Listening

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with People At Work host Bev Attfield about his journey to finding an employee-centric business model and developing a workplace culture where everybody leads and every voice is respected, valued, and heard. Kevin shares how devastating feeling unheard can be, both in the workplace and in the community, and he has developed a way to embrace all voices at Hancock Lumber. By sharing the leadership responsibilities with everyone, Kevin has decentralized the power and spread it across everyone in the company. He shares the impact this has had, economically and socially, and how it can be utilized for any community, not just the workplace.

Click here to listen to (or read) the full interview.

We Believe in Shared Leadership

In this article, Kevin Hancock is interviewed about his progressive view on shared leadership. He shares how the lumber industry is often misunderstood and seen as outdated, but he says this is inaccurate. Everything from the technology inside the sawmills to the culture fostered at the company is modern and innovative. Kevin explains more about why the shared leadership, employee-first company model has been so successful.

“The company focuses on the employee experience, and in doing so, positions employees to really create a world-class customer experience.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.

Q&A: Company Culture, Productivity, and Retention: How Does Your Company Measure Up?

The Softwood Forest Products Buyer is reaching out to company leaders across the industry to solicit their input on key issues that impact overall business success. In this publication, Kevin Hancock shares his insights.

“Some organizations collect leadership power into the bureaucratic center, where a few people can make the majority of the decisions for the many. This is the traditional model of business—and government—leadership and, during a period of time in human history, this may have been optimal.

But, that time has passed. of cultures don’t see employees as expendable commodities whose purpose is to serve the company. In fact, these types of cultures flip the traditional script by recognizing that the company exists to serve the people who work there. In a great company, profit is an outcome of a higher calling. That higher calling is the celebration of the human spirit and human capacity. In this way, culture makes all the difference.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.

A Lesson in Leadership From the CEO of One of America’s Oldest Companies

In this interview, Kevin Hancock is asked specifically about his leadership style and how it differs from others. They also speak about how important your authentic voice is and why it is important to listen without judgment. Kevin highlights the importance of hearing voices besides your own, especially as a leader. By engaging others, their voice can start to be heard and they can become leaders as well.

Click here to read the full interview.




Reclaiming Your Voice with Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Path11 Podcast host April Hannah about his newest book 48 Whispers and his journeys to Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. They discuss the loss of Kevin’s voice and how it led him on a quest to find his center, regain his voice, and help strengthen the voices of those who have lost theirs. Through these experiences, Kevin began to learn more about shared leadership as a way to preserve his voice and uplift others. They also discuss spirituality, healing, and photography.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.




How to Change Your Leadership Style for the Better

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with The PR Maven Podcast host Nancy Marshall about shared leadership. They begin by speaking about the importance of continuing to change, even if your business is over 150 years old. He shares how his personal journey led to a change in leadership style for Hancock Lumber and what it has meant for the lives of those who work there. Kevin also talks about the implications it has had on the business and how he hopes others can evaluate their leadership style.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.




The Profit and Power of Being an Employee CENTRIC Companies

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Enlightenment of Change podcast host Connie Whitman. They speak together about his book The Seventh Power, One CEO’s Journey into the Business of Shared Leadership. They speak about the power of shared leadership and what the benefits are to both the employees and the company. Kevin speaks from experience about how shared leadership has grown Hancock Lumber and all those who are impacted by the company.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.




Kevin Hancock: A CEO Discovers His True Voice

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Work and Life Podcast host Stew Friedman about the changes his leadership style and life underwent after losing his voice. Kevin shares how important changing way he approached leadership became and how strengthening the voices of others to help them find their true, authentic self became his life mission. He also talks about how Hancock Lumber has grown exponentially since sharing leadership and power in the organization. Kevin and Stew speak about the faults of having top-down management with power condensed at the top leadership.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • What they really needed was the encouragement and the safety to trust their own voice. And that was the beginning of me starting to think very differently about leadership and the possibility of leadership really being about dispersing power, not collecting it and using the limitations in my own voice to strengthen the voices of others, specifically in that case, everybody within our company. (9:13-9:49)
  • I found this powerful, powerful presence of nature on the Northern Plains. I found this amazing lost indigenous community that had endured so much, yet still carried love and faith and hope and optimism, and that they have preserved against all odds, if you will, a wisdom set that I came to believe that modern humanity really needed and could benefit from. (16:57-17:35)
  • I mean, you think about the model of we’re going to honor you exactly as you are, that resonates with pretty much everybody, which is why I love the model and the goal. It’s winning for everybody. (47:02-47:22)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Employee-Centric Versus Capital-Centric Organizations, with Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Human Capital Innovations Podcast host Dr. John Westover about shared leadership and employee-centric organizations. They discuss the differences, benefits, and drawbacks of capital-centric organizations and how the shift to shared leadership has impacted Hancock Lumber.

“We have been at it for over a decade, so we have very good empirical evidence. Our performance in every category we measure took off. What’s so interesting is, the performance took off when we made the people in the company, not the company, the first priority.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

 

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • Now, this is where the leadership epiphany kicked in. Having done that say several hundred exchanges, several hundred times, here is what struck me, John. People already knew what to do. They didn’t actually need a top-down CEO direct management driven directive. What they really needed was the confidence and encouragement and safety and the culture of the company to trust their own voice and act on their own judgment. And that’s when it started to hit me that maybe partial loss of my own voice, which I only previously ever thought of as a hindrance or a liability or quite literally a pain in the neck, was actually a gift and a blessing and an invitation to lead differently in a way that strengthens the voices of others. And that’s what really got me originally into this idea of dispersed power, shared leadership, and an employee-centric company.  (07:28-08:52)
  • So this is really all about flipping the script, to your point. That the old business model is really about the employee exists to serve the corporation, the employee is an asset of the corporation to be deployed. The new model, which is such a better fit for the 21st century, is the company exists to serve the people who work there. And if a company becomes exceptional at serving the people who work there, I guarantee you those people will make sure the company soars. So it’s a really nuanced flip of the script. This will dramatically improve corporate performance, this approach to thinking differently about engaging employees. But that really becomes the outcome of a higher calling, which is honoring human beings as human beings at work. (15:43-16:55)
  • Our company is one of the oldest in America, it goes back to the 1840s. Just to put the power of an employee-centric approach and perspective, I’ll share this, we ended up making more money in the last 10 years than we did from 1848-2012. And the company had done well enough to exist for over 150 years, but our performance in every category we measure just took off. And what’s interesting is the performance of the company took off by making the people of the company, not the company, the first priority. It’s very counterintuitive and yet so sensible. (18:41-19:36)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




The 7th Power – Shared Leadership with Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Leadership Re-Imagined host Dr. Jane Lovas about his leadership philosophy and The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. They discuss how his leadership style changed from top-down to shared and dispersed power. He shares his story about how his leadership style so drastically changed and the business implications of this change. Kevin and Jane also discuss supply chains, buying patterns, and how Hancock Lumber hopes to challenge these norms.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • I think we really have entered a localism where power is dispersing on this planet. And I don’t know yet that the consumers have fully realized the power they have. So if you think about it this way, consumers, the general public want overwhelmingly corporations to become more holistic in their goals, to be about more than just profit, to be about humanity, about the environment. I agree with all of that, a hundred percent (8:10-8:54)
  • And around the outside of that wheel, Jane, they will say live the six great eternal powers, the power of the west, north, east, south, sky, and earth. But the center of the wheel lives the seventh power, and that seventh power is you. It’s me. It’s the individual human spirit that Sioux believes and understands that everything that exists in the universe is connected. It’s related. (12:04-12:43)
  • In that old approach we always say someone didn’t fit that got let go from a company, people would say, well, he or she failed. He or she wasn’t good enough, he or she couldn’t cut it, but that’s just plain wrong.  (21:27-21:49)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Finding My Voice in the Land of Crazy Horse with Author Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Lucid Cafe host Wendy Halley about his books, Not For SaleThe Seventh Power, and 48 Whispers. They speak about the challenges that losing Kevin’s voice presented and how he was able to overcome and feel that his new condition was a gift. Kevin shares about his journey to Pine Ridge and the lessons he learned while there, especially about leadership. He and Wendy also discuss how sharing leadership not only helped Kevin with his voice disorder, but to help empower the voices of others.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • The people there and their culture have a lot to offer the rest of humanity, the planet earth and modern society, and really become comfortable talking about that, that their community is often thought of as a past based community. But what I really came to see is they, in my view, are carrying wisdom through, in large part, their intimate connectivity to nature, carrying wisdom that is desperately needed by humanity in the 21st century. (11:22-12:09)
  • I think you’re valuable, powerful, meaningful, interesting, fun. All of that. You know, the community needs economic resources, but it needs non-economic resources too, it needs that connectivity and respect and empowerment and love. And that’s the part that really has been meaningful for me. (17:04-17:34)
  • Freeing people to speak with their own voice, that makes management and leadership exponentially easier. I cannot tell you how much easier leadership has gotten here once we chose to share it and disperse it and simply meet people where they are. I wrap that up with this simple thought because for me that summarizes it. It’s that idea that nothing has to change in you for you to be amazing. (29:40-30:15)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




The Seventh Power – with Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Being Human host Richard Atherton about his book The Seventh Power. They start by talking about how Kevin lost his voice and the journey that he undertook to Pine Ridge to find inner balance. He explains how this journey led him to the realization that other people’s voices are unique, others are capable of leading, and that leadership should be dispersed. Kevin and Richard also speak about how Hancock Lumber has flourished since his shift in leadership and how other companies can follow suit. Click here to listen to the full podcast.

 

Here are few highlight excerpts from the talk: (Click here to view the full transcription)

  • As a CEO, my primary tool had been my voice. And suddenly I couldn’t use it. Long story short, when it’s hard to talk, you quickly develop strategies for doing less of it. (03:37-03:53)
  • And that’s when it hit me that maybe I own voice limitation, which I only ever thought of previously as a hindrance or a liability or a pain in the neck, was actually a bit of a gift or invitation to lead differently in a way that pushed power out away from the center and gave others a stronger voice. (05:41 -06:12)
  • I got this giant shot across my bow in the form of a voice condition that forced me to change in a way that was a blessing. And really, when you oversimplify it, when you talk less, you listen more. And the biggest voice I started hearing more clearly was my own. (28:01-28:32)

 

Click here to download a PDF transcription.

 




Moontower Business Podcast: 48 Whispers

In this podcast, host Joseph OBell talks to Kevin Hancock about his newest book, 48 Whispers. To begin, they talk about why Kevin journeyed to Pine Ridge and the experiences he had while there. He then speaks about how his time with the Sioux tribe at Pine Ridge led to writing his books and what he hopes readers can take away from reading them. He highlights how important human connectivity is and how it can help break free from the robotic nature of day-to-day life.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • And I had lost track a bit of my own identity, separate from my roles and going to this community where nobody knew me, which had a really deep indigenous spirituality and where the power of plains- if you’ve ever been there, are just so dramatic. That all of that really helped recenter me. (11:04-11:30)
  • One of the key messages I really tried to send in the book is that done correctly, being selfish is selfless, because when we listen to that inner voice and do those things that make us light up, that’s when we give the most back to the world around us as well. (14:32-14:54)
  • And honestly, I feel the book is meant for humans. My editor and publisher, they always try to put things in a box, but when they say, who’s the book for Kevin? I say, well, it’s for humans. And that’s honestly how I feel. And I have a sense you might feel the same way. That’s really the spirit within which the book was written. (25:07-26:33)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Interview with PatZi Gil – Joy on Paper Show

In this interview, Kevin Hancock speaks with PatZi Gil, host of the Joy on Paper Show, about his newest book, 48 Whispers. Kevin and PatZi speak about his trips to South Dakota, the inspiration behind the book, the Lakota tribe he befriended, and the nature he experienced. They speak about the Seventh Power, both the ideology in the Pine Ridge culture, and the book Kevin wrote. They finish the interview by speaking about the restorative power of nature and their love for trees and lumber.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • And yet that simple universal power of goodness lives within us all and it can still be transcended. And we can all bring it forth in an instant, every single human can bring goodness forth. (7:02-7:20)
  • The world in real life is more manageable than it is as viewed through a screen. In that writing, I encourage people a bit more to turn the TV off, turn the computer off, put the phone away and get out and immerse yourself in the world that’s right beside you. (8:30-8:53)
  • Aiding community cultures, where it’s safe for people to be their authentic selves, because when people are their authentic selves, that’s when they shine the brightest. (12:21-12:33)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription (part 2).




The Breakfast Club Guest: Kevin Hancock

In this radio podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with The Breakfast Club host Mark about his career, his newest book, 48 Whispers, and his mission to empower and strengthen the voices of those around him. During Kevin’s life journey, he has adapted Hancock Lumber to create balance for the employees and ensure that their voices are heard in the company. Kevin also shares how he became involved with the Lakota at Pine Ridge and how this led to his idea of shared leadership.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • You’ve always got to live in the present and really perform in the present moment. And certainly our company has become very focused on the employee experience, the people who work at the company, making sure that work is a meaningful for them. So that’s really kind of what brought us down that best places to work path. (01:13-01:39)
  • This book is really about coming into your own voice. It’s a photojournalism book that takes a bunch of my favorite pictures from over a decade of traveling out to the reservation in South Dakota. And then pairs that with 48 short meditations. And if I had to summarize what all those meditations have in common, it’s really about coming into your own voice, self-awareness, really turning inward to find your strength, your purpose, your path. Where we’re all living in a world where there’s so much external noise, 24/7, internet wired world, that what can get lost in that I think is our sense of self. And this book is really about the idea that you’ve got to build your future from within. You’ve got to really look within yourself, connect with the essence of who you are, and then build an external life that’s true to that. (12:58-14:05)
  • Simply put, the people who work in a company know how to make it better. They know what holds it back. And all leaders really have to do is to create a safe environment where the right questions get asked, and the people that work there feel good about just actually saying what they honestly think and know. (19:59-20:21)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Success Made to Last

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with host Rick Tocquigny about shared leadership. Kevin describes how losing the full use of his speaking voice led him to Pine Ridge, where he discovered an entire community that did not feel heard. The two events convinced Kevin that each human is here on earth in a personal quest to find and share their own unique and never to be repeated voice. Unfortunately, across time leaders have done more to restrict the voices of others than to liberate them. Kevin takes these understandings and develops and deploys a new leadership model designed to push power out – away from the corporate center – and give everyone in the organization a leading voice. The result is a high performing corporate model in which business metrics soar as an outcome of a higher calling.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.




Happy Hour Podcast: Guest Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin speaks to host Joel Fleischman about Kevin’s story of finding the power of shared leadership. Kevin explains how he struggled with losing his voice and the journey he started to gain inner acceptance and balance, as well as ways he could continue to lead his family’s company. He also speaks with Joel about how ego plays an essential role in modern leadership, delving further to explain why it is important to shed your ego in the leadership role.

Click here to watch the full podcast.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • I’ve really become very focused on what I can control. What I can control. And I’ve really tried to not exert my energy on all those things I cannot control. And when I found that, when I oriented myself that way, my life got a lot easier. (12:04-12:32)
  • They didn’t actually need direction from me, 99% of the time to begin with. They knew what to do. What they really needed was the courage and confidence and the safety and culture to trust their own voice. (16:21-16:39)
  • But this book is about self-inquiry. It’s about heightened self-awareness. It’s about coming into your own voice, and really turning inward to find your personal power. (36:28-36:46)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Heart-Centered Sales Leader

Heart Centered Sales Leader In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to host Connie Whitman about his book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. In his book, Kevin shares the philosophy, values and strategies Hancock Lumber Company has embraced on its journey toward becoming an employee-centric company. They also discuss the dangers of being a leader who micromanages a team and the effects this can have on self-worth, work ethic, and stress levels.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • My whole approach is that leaders need to make themselves smaller so that others around them can become bigger. (11:14-11:22)
  • Every employee at our company knows their specific role better than anybody else does. And also in the modern age where everything has to happen so quickly, that old model of, I have a question, wait, let me take it up the hill to the emperor or empress on the throne. It just doesn’t work anymore. (19:05-19:34)
  • When people participate in decision making, that’s how you get buy-in. That’s how you get alignment. That’s how you get discipline. You get it voluntarily. You can never hold it through fear and terror and power. You can’t win that way in the 21st century. (27:09-27:31)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Keep it Local Maine: Episode 29

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Keep It Local Maine hosts Kimberly and Todd Regoulinsky about his shared leadership philosophy and creating an employee-centric business model for Hancock Lumber. He shares the journey that brought him to this understanding and how important he feels investing in your employees is for the business and for the employee. He has created a culture where the leadership responsibilities are shared among everyone, meaning that solutions are coming from the people working inside the situations and not just upper management. Kevin can see the confidence that it helps build when everyone’s voice is respected, heard, and valued.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • But essentially what happened was I had to quite quickly come up with a new approach to leading that involved not talking very much. And that led me down a simple trail at that point. If you’re not going to talk a lot, you’re going to listen a lot. And so I really ended up kind of flipping my approach leadership, from talking to listening, and from being on that stage, to sharing the stage. (04:06-04:40)
  • It’s about leaders or managers actually doing less, not more. And really focusing more on the culture of the organization. And creating a platform for a truth that authenticity to surface. Because you know, you think about it. In any organization, if people feel safe, safe to just be their authentic selves, say what they think, be who they are, be at peace as they are, just think about how transformational that one template can be. It really changes everything. (07:02-07:46)
  • Like our performance as a company has improved pretty dramatically in the year following this approach. But that’s, to me, the outcome of something bigger and more important. Which is really just celebrating – I mean, I don’t want to overdo it – but humanity. The sacredness of each person honoring everybody as they are. It’s actually kind of getting back to a simpler approach. And when you just honor everybody as they are and don’t feel like you have to fix, control, change, regulate, direct everybody, think about how much easier life gets. (11:27-12:14)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




We Need More From Business and It Starts With Listening

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with People At Work host Bev Attfield about his journey to finding an employee-centric business model and developing a workplace culture where everybody leads and every voice is respected, valued, and heard. Kevin shares how devastating feeling unheard can be, both in the workplace and in the community, and he has developed a way to embrace all voices at Hancock Lumber. By sharing the leadership responsibilities with everyone, Kevin has decentralized the power and spread it across everyone in the company. He shares the impact this has had, economically and socially, and how it can be utilized for any community, not just the workplace.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • And I think that it starts within ourselves, even to be more specific. That the leaders need to change the way they approach leadership, the way they think about listening, the purpose of listening, the power of showing respect for all voices. (10:07-10:32)
  • It is a manifestation of nature. It is a manifestation of the divine and the individual is a sacred power source of its own. And I think that really is where we’re headed. (23:35-23:53)
  • In nature, the leadership power is dispersed. It lives in all aspects of nature. And because humans are a part of nature, not separate from it, we ultimately are on a long arching path of aspiration to live in harmony with that natural rule. (27:06-27:33)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Finding Center and Voice Through All the Noise

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Enlightenment of Change host Connie Whitman about his journey to finding a new business model and leadership style. Kevin firmly believes that developing people, listening to their ideas, and empowering them to make decisions is one of the most important things a workplace can do for their employees. He integrated an employee-centric business model at Hancock Lumber, allowing the leadership responsibilities to be shared by every employee. He fosters a safe and respectful place for ideas and solutions to be made at the employee level instead of consolidating power at the top. He shares how this has affected the business and the engagement and satisfaction levels of his employees, and finishes by sharing that this practice is for any community, not just the workplace.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • At Pine Ridge, I met an entire community that felt marginalized, pushed to the side and not really authentically heard. And that really made me realize that there are lots of ways for humans to lose a piece of their voice in this world. (5:50-6:11)
  • What is indigenous wisdom? Well, in my view, it’s available to us all, but to acquire it, you have to live intimately with nature. When you look at communities that lived intimately with nature, the sun, the moon, the sky, the resources, you end up becoming in sync with nature’s most fundamental rules. That, in my view, is the essence of indigenous wisdom. (19:54-20:25)
  • So I did feel like, well, if someone from a bit of a higher profile position of leadership was willing to dump their entire soul out and share it, that might help give permission and safety for others to do the same. That for me is the real essence of that journey and this book. (32:36-33:02)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




The Seventh Power

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to The Bregman Leadership Podcast host Peter Bregman about his new book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership and the leadership style he adopted from his findings. Kevin has integrated an employee-centric culture into Hancock Lumber, highlighted by the importance of everybody partaking in a leadership role. By empowering others to lead, Kevin has been able to foster a safe space for ideas to be implemented and challenges overcome. The results for the business have been astounding, but Kevin ensures to speak about how any community can benefit from this interconnectivity and shared leadership practice.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • What struck me after months and months of answering a question with a question, was people already knew what to do. This is what really got me thinking differently about leadership. They didn’t actually need a top-down, management-centric directive to the vast majority of questions and challenges that they faced during the course of a workday. They already knew what to do. All they really needed was the confidence and the courage to trust their own judgment and voice, and a safe work culture to know that it would be okay to make a mistake or have something they chose to do not go perfectly. (11:40-12:33)
  • But what we’ve found is that if people feel they aren’t being included in a transparent, authentic process of making decisions, that they are much more apt to support those outcomes. Our safety director is fond of saying that people support that, which they help to create. So we’ve actually seen by having authentic dialogue, is the discipline to core systems and best practices actually improves. It doesn’t weaken or fray, it actually strengths. (17:07 -17:47)
  • The truth is, great people are everywhere. There’s a sacred light that dwells within us all. Everyone has value to contribute and the ability to lead. The idea is to turn the corporation inside out. In the old model, employees were commodities that sacrificed and served the organization. In the new model, the organization becomes a conduit for serving individuals within a company. For example, self-actualization, one employee at a time becomes the goal. Profit, while enhanced is now the outcome of a higher purpose. (20:05-20:39)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Kevin Hancock on What Matters Most Podcast

Kevin Hancock joins What Matters Most host Paul Samuel Dolman to speak about his shared leadership philosophy. They speak about how CEOs and other leaders might elegantly break down the planet’s entrenched, top-down governance model in favor of a new playbook for heightened human engagement, hallmarked by shared leadership, dispersed power, and respect for all voices.

The What Matters Most podcast covers a wide range of topics and hosts an array of industry influencers and world leaders.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • So when I put the two experiences together, my own voice experience, and then my time at Pine Ridge, I really concluded, unfortunately, that across time leaders had probably done more limit and restrict the voices of others, than to liberate or empower them. And that’s what got me really thinking about a new model that did just the opposite. That strengthened the voices of others and shared the opportunities and responsibilities of leadership. (05:59-06:36)
  • So I’ve really changed my thinking on what it means to give back to society. And I think what it means, is actually turning inward and focusing on bringing forth your very best authentic self. It’s that whole idea of knowing what makes you light up. And following that light. And that is when we give the most back to the world around us. So done correctly in the 21st century, I would say that being selfish is selfless. That it’s time for everyone to really serve themselves and make themselves strong as the pathway to be inspirational and valuable and supportive to others. (21:14-22:10)
  • Simply, I think – and this is somewhat in a Lakota or Sioux or indigenous perspective – that seeking is the biggest step in finding. And I think today, if to the extent people are not finding their own voice or their own identity or their own passions, it’s just because they aren’t looking hard enough. I think it’s really about making yourself a bigger priority and believing that you can only become exponentially more valuable to others by primarily focusing on your own voice. (23:46-24:37)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




The Inventions Show EP10: Kevin Hancock, CEO Hancock Lumber

I wanted to take a moment to share a recent podcast I participated in on The Inventions Show with host Tack Lee. Here is his excerpt from our chat: Live with your heart not just your head with Kevin Hancock, a sixth-generation family CEO of Hancock Lumber, one of the oldest companies in America which dates back to 1848. An extraordinary leader who is also an award-winning author and speaker. Simply Inspirational and transformational. Kevin shares his incredible journey of self discovery after being diagnosed with a rare neurological condition that made speaking difficult. How he had to think differently and reinvent leadership through dispersing of power. His mission to strengthen the voice of others and come into their own true voice.

Click here to watch the video podcast.




Strengthening Through Listening

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Create What You Speak host Sloane Freemont about the leadership style he implemented at Hancock Lumber where everyone leads and power is dispersed. By sharing the leadership responsibility with many instead of consolidating at the top of the organization, Kevin is helping strengthen the unique voices of his employees and helping them gain confidence in themselves and their ideas. He tells Sloane about the journey he undertook to find this new leadership style and how the business has been affected by the changes. He also discusses how this is a model that is built for any type of community and does not have to be limited to a business setting.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • So picture this age-old setting, someone comes up to me at work because I’m the CEO or one of the “bosses” with a question or a problem. Normally I would have given a directive and an answer and an instruction. And now I started simply saying, “Well, that is a good question. What do you think we should do about it?” And while at first that was just a move to protect my voice, what really struck me over time was simply this, people already knew what to do. When I gave them the opportunity to respond, I found that they already knew what to do. They didn’t need a top-down kind of leadership directive after all. What they really needed was kind of permission and safety and encouragement to trust and follow their own voice. (04:40-05:41)
  • And I really ultimately came to see my own voice condition as a bit of an invitation to strengthen the voices of others. (06.41-06.52)
  • Yeah. And I think in the modern age, in which we live, we’ve really got to rethink the very meaning of winning to your point. We all grew up or read history, or you think about the Roman Colosseum, it was a kill or be killed or sports to win you have to defeat someone else, but I think in the modern world where we’re all so connected where the world has become so flat and we really are a single human tribe, we’ve got to change the definition of winning. And the simple way I like to talk about it now is winning Isn’t winning unless everybody’s winning. [24:45-25:32]

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




The Power of Shared Leadership in Business

In this video series, Kevin Hancock speaks to Fire It Up With CJ host CJ Liu about his journey to a business culture where everybody leads, managing a business through the COVID pandemic, and his new book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. They discuss the sustainability of an employee-centric business model and how a company of Hancock Lumber’s size fares in this environment. Kevin finishes their discussion by sharing that empowering the voices of others and listening to their authentic voice is not just for business, but it is a movement that can happen in any community.

Click here to watch the video series.




Leadership & Americas Oldest Private Company

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Success Stories host Scott D. Clary about the leadership style he has implemented at Hancock Lumber. He shares how he developed this shared leadership philosophy and the impact it has had on his employees and the business itself. He believes that every voice should be heard, trusted, and respected, and that by sharing the leadership responsibility better ideas are born. Kevin also talks about how this impacts employee engagement, job satisfaction, self worth, and how people feel about the company they work for. He finishes by talking about what he hopes the future holds, both for the company and for the world.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • So I kind of stumbled upon this idea, and then really got serious about how a company would institutionalize a structure of dispersed power and shared leadership, where everyone felt like they had a voice. So we went to work really re-setting our core systems to be more inclusive, and to create more space for dialogue. Essentially, patience for process so that everyone could have an opportunity to participate in discussions around the most important choices the company was making. And we learned pretty quickly that the real key to making that work was to change the purpose and nature of listening. (08:46- 09:53)
  • People are much more apt to support that which they’ve helped to create. So in this period where we’ve tried to create space for all voices to lead, our efficiencies improved dramatically, our accuracy has improved dramatically, our rework has gone down, our productivity has gone up, and the company’s performance really took off. I’ll put it in perspective this way, we ended up earning more money, the company, from 2010 to 2020, then we did from 1848 to 2009. (11:24-I2:13)
  • So I could spend 65 hours a week at work, but this would not make me a better human or a better manager. The purpose of work is to support, not thwart, the meaning of life. Companies must create pay systems, work schedules, and human missions, that put time back into the hands of employees. The objective is to help everyone get out of their lane and to broaden their lives. (17:59-18:17)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




The Day That Changed Everything

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to MaineBiz publisher Donna Brassard about how losing his voice changed everything in a day. He shares how he overcame this challenge and created a fruitful new leadership style from the lessons he learned. Kevin began sharing the leadership role with everyone at Hancock Lumber and found that great ideas were everywhere and people knew how to solve the problems in their daily lives. By empowering them to make the changes they needed, employee engagement and job satisfaction spiked. Kevin shares how he hopes other business and communities can learn from his new leadership style and more authentic voices can be brought into the light.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • The idea is to put more power and control in the hands of the very people on the front lines of the business, who are doing the work and who know their area of the business best. So in that approach, management’s job really becomes a function of learning how to listen and making it safe for people to say what they actually think. My biggest wish for any organization would be that it’s safe for people to say what they think. 14:18-14:59
  • Leaders have done more to limit, restrict, intimidate or direct the voices of others than to free them. (17:59-18:12)
  • I think the purpose of work should be do advance the lives of the people who do it. Work should be meaningful to the people who do it. And if a company focuses on creating an exceptional work experience, one of the outcomes will be the employees will take great care of the company. So this approach will actually improve corporate performance. (23:06-23:34)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Dispersing Power and Strengthening the Voices of Others

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Human Capital Innovations host Jonathan H. Westover, PhD about his new book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. They discuss how the work culture Kevin has fostered at Hancock Lumber has created an environment where every voice is heard, trusted, and respected. By doing so, this empowers the voices of others and creates a heightened level of employee engagement and job satisfaction. Kevin also talks about how this can be used in any community setting, and discusses how it would change the future to see more areas where everybody leads.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • In nature, power is dispersed. That secret sauce, that sacred energy of the universe, actually lives in all its parts and pieces. And humans, w ho are apart of nature not separate from it, I believe ultimately want to organize in this way. And in the 21st century, in the query and age, I think this is where you see the disconnect. So people are awakening to their own sacred power as individuals. But institutions are still often locked in this past-based approach to leadership, which is about collecting power to the center, having a few speak for the many, and taking a bureaucratic approach to get things done. And while that model might have been the dominant model for centuries looking backward, I do not believe it’s going to be the dominant model going forward. (08:55-10:08)
  • So if work becomes a place where everyone can kind of self-actualize, can test their skills, can come to know their own identity and can feel safe doing so, then work starts to become a really important social tool, not just an economic tool. I’ve really, to take that one step further, come to think very differently about the mission or purpose of work. I think that the economic results are an important outcome. Outcome, of a higher calling. And I think that higher calling is that work should be meaningful to the people who do it. (13:36-14:28)
  • But I had a gentlemen show me one day when I was at Pine Ridge, that the center of the wheel, those who know the old ways, he told me, know that seventh power also exists. And that seventh power is you. It’s me. It’s the individual human spirit. Which is of nature, of the universe, of the sacred spirit. However you want to think about it. And that every individual is a piece of the divine. So the real task in social justice and in rethinking organizational excellence, is about giving away from the bureaucracy, getting away from the monolith, getting away from the empire, and putting the focus back on the individual and helping individuals understand and tap into their own power.(28:34-29:39)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




The Seventh Power- Shared Leadership

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Financially Speaking host Mitch Slater about the effects of the COVID pandemic on Hancock Lumber and how he came to reinvent the way leadership is dispersed within the company. He shares the journey he undertook that led him to the realization that in nature, power is dispersed. By dispersing power and leadership, engagement is heightened and confidence grows. At Hancock Lumber, Kevin hopes that by sharing the leadership burden, employees will find new ways to learn, grow, and begin to self-actualize. He finishes by sharing how the company has handled the transition and where he sees the future leading.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.




The 7th Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership After a Rare Voice Disorder

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with The Quiet Warrior Show host Tom Dutta about his new book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. They begin by talking about Kevin’s trip to Pine Ridge. They also discuss the new leadership style implemented at Hancock Lumber, transforming the company culture into one where everyone at the company has power, is encouraged to lead, and can openly discuss ideas. He talks about how the culture has been received and the ways that the company has flourished.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • And I really got focused for the first time in a long time on my own identity, beyond my roles and really got to see my role as a CEO for what it was, which was an important role I played, but not the essence of who I was. (6:52-7:14)
  • They didn’t actually need a top-down directive. They just needed encouragement and a safe work culture to trust their judgment. (17:08-17:17)
  • But when you change your mission, you’ve got to develop a whole new set of metrics around how to measure that and a whole new set of systems to make sure everyone has a voice and everyone has the opportunity to share in the responsibilities of leadership, which we’ve been working on now for the better part of a decade. And it’s had a big impact on our performance. But I really, now, talk about that as the outcome of a higher calling, not the ultimate calling, is to be valuable to the lives of these human beings who are working at the company. (11:29-12:12)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Finding Your Authentic Voice

Kevin Hancock joins the Leadership from the Core “Love in Action” podcast with Episode 53, Finding Your Authentic Voice. Host Marcel Schwantes chats with Kevin, who shares his inspirational story of finding purpose in the midst of adversity and re-scripting his definition of leadership as a result. They also discuss his new book, The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey into the Business of Shared Leadership. Marcel Schwantes is the founder and chief human officer of Leadership from the Core, a global leadership training and executive coaching boutique with one core purpose: to grow profitable and powerful servant leaders through “Love in Action.”

“Leaders who want to create a culture of shared leadership should talk less, sit still more, have faith in their people, and engage their power. The way to get people to pick up more is simply to occupy less. The power of them all leading is just immeasurably greater than anything I could do on my own.”  – Kevin Hancock

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • Because what I found through repeatedly asking this question was lovely. It was Love In Action. What I found was that people already knew what to do. They did not actually need most of the time a CEO manager-direct directive. They knew what to do. What they really needed was encouragement and a safe culture to trust their own voice and to do what they knew was the best thing to do. (08:19-08:53)
  • Everyone has a valuable, powerful, unique, never to be repeated voice. And the best cultural model for an organization is to release those voices, not restrict them. So once people kind of got the idea around the cultural concept of what we wanted to do, everything actually got a lot easier and smoother. And our company’s performance took off, and employee engagement took off, and so I really kind of came to see what happened with me as a hinder or our liability, to actually be a bit of a gift and an invitation to strengthen the voices of others. (10:51-11:44)
  • What struck me at Pine Ridge was I met in an entire community that felt as if a piece of their voice had been taken, or stolen, or was missing, and that they were not fully heard. And the combination of those two events created some really powerful, personal learnings. First, I knew what it was like to not feel heard because of my disorder. And second, at Pine Ridge I realized there were lots of ways for people to lose their voice in this world. And putting two and two together even started to think about the very purpose of a human life on earth and considered maybe it was to self-actualize. Maybe we’re all here just trying to find our unique, never to be repeated voice. (14:01-14:55)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Kevin Hancock: The Seventh Power

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to The Better Show host Ian Mikutel about his new book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey into the Business of Shared Leadership. Kevin and Ian speak about how his new leadership style formed, why companies struggle to disperse power within the organization, and what individuals can do to empower their voice, the voices of others, and learn to share leadership. Kevin also shares how listening affects leadership and that we should strive to listen for understanding instead of judgment. Sharing leadership and understanding the true voice of others is something that Kevin is passionate about everyone learning about and using in their daily lives.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • I think you really start right at the beginning and say, “Well, does leadership matter?” I think you start with that. And I think, particularly right now in these challenging times, I think everyone would agree that I agree that leadership matters. And when you think about the COVID-19 challenge and you ask the question, “Well, who’s going to have to lead on this challenge?” The answer is obvious, everybody. It’s going to take everybody to lead. So I think leadership matters. And I have come to believe that the best way to lead is in a shared way where power is distributed and everyone is helping to lead. (04:40-05:24)
  • The first reason shared leadership is a bit difficult is because humanity has gone through generations upon generations of a different type of leadership model that is built on collecting power to the center. Historically, the way you gained power and lead was by collecting it. And the more you collected, the more control and influence you had. But in the 21st century, that script is not working that well. (06:41-07:24)
  • I’ve come to believe, which is the fun part, that sharing leadership is much easier than not sharing it. Think about it that way. I’ve kind of flipped it inside out. And think about all the structure and control that has to be a place to not share leadership. That’s actually hard to do. Sharing leadership really, when you contemplate it, is easier, it’s intuitive, it benefits everybody, and it’s not a complicated exercise. Collecting leadership is complicated, sharing it is not. (21:32-22:24)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Guy’s Guy Radio: Marc Cameron & Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Guy’s Guy Radio host Robert Manni about his newest book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. They discuss Kevin’s journey and how he came to find the philosophy that everybody should lead. At Hancock Lumber, Kevin works to create a safe and respectful environment for everyone to discuss their thoughts and lead the team to solutions. This not only increases the confidence in the decision-making process, but it also allows the leadership responsibilities to be spread across many minds and many people. Listening to others allows them to find their authentic voice, which leads to higher employee engagement and job satisfaction levels.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • And that’s what I really got excited about. The idea within our own company of creating a culture that gave everybody a voice and made it safe for everyone to say what they actually thought, and to share the responsibility for speaking for the company – because I couldn’t do it myself – and for leading the company. (39:10-39:39)
  • It’s a notion that essentially everyone is capable of leading, and everyone has a voice that’s worth being heard. And that the culture is really what separates organizations. Cultures either collect power to the center and put it in the hands of the few, or those cultures disperse power and strengthen the voices of others. (40:57-41:38)
  • Well, I think the one big thought is to make the employee experience a top priority. That sounds simple, but it’s powerful. Corporations are good at whatever they choose to focus on. So really, the simple act of making the employee experience a top corporate priority, will had a huge impact on improving the employee experience. (43:57-44:29)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Kevin Hancock of Hancock Lumber

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to The Grow Maine Show host Marty Grohman about his journey to finding the new employee-centric business model at Hancock Lumber. By dispersing the power of leadership to everyone in the company, Kevin found that employee engagement and job satisfaction are heightened to a new level. Employees are encouraged to find solutions to the problems they identify as important and given a safe space to solve them. This level of trust and respect between managers and employees has created a unique work culture. The company has thrived because of it, but Kevin notes that any and all communities are able to foster this type of relationship.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • But long story short, with my voice difficulty, I really ended up seeing, getting forced into initially, and then embracing an opportunity to essentially let everybody speak for the company and got really excited about this idea of, well, why can’t everybody lead? (5:26-5:50)
  • So I guess what I may say in summary is that I think the key is trying to create a culture at work where it’s safe for people to actually say what they think, including difficult times when we’re looking at a situation that didn’t go great. (14:29-14:55)
  • So, that’s one thing I’ve really learned across my career is that you can be really good within your own organization, but there are going to be forces that come to play or to bear that are bigger than you are, and you have got to be agile and change responsive and financially strong in order to constantly be readjusting and reinventing your business. (39:55-40:38)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Shared Leadership: Giving a Voice to Others

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Life As Leadership host Josh Friedeman about leadership and empowering the voices of others. He shares the journey he underwent to finding the employee-centric business model and how sharing the leadership responsibility among everyone at Hancock Lumber has created a flourishing culture and business. By giving others the opportunity to lead, employee engagement and job satisfaction has skyrocketed and problems are being solved by everyone. Kevin speaks about how this can and should be applied to all types of communities and the benefits it creates for all involved.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • And that’s what I really got excited about this idea of, well, my own voice condition might have limited my ability to speak at times, but maybe it was an invitation to strengthen the voices of others. (9:20-9:34)
  • But I think having said that, specifically to your question, the big epiphany or turning point for me was starting to see the business of business as being more than just business. (16:19-16:37)
  • Now, having said that, the other reason I’m such a big believer in that approach is simply to ask oneself who is the human being that you can most influence and that’s self evident as well, that the only person, any of us can really change is ourselves. And I have found that the best way to create change within an organization is to become it. (27:52-28:24)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




If Everyone’s Voice Was Heard, What Might Change?

Kevin Hancock appears on the b Cause podcast with host Erin Hatzikostas. In this podcast, Kevin and Erin speak about his shared leadership philosophy, visiting the Pine Ridge Native American Reserve, spiritual enlightenment, and his new book, The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership.

The b Cause podcast works to give people unique, fun and bite-sized solutions that provide the energy, inspiration and permission they need to rise in their careers, without selling their souls.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • Rarely in real life did they actually need a CEO centric solution to the questions or the problems that they were facing. They actually already knew what to do. (14:01-14:17)
  • And then I took it one step further and said you know, perhaps even the very meaning or purpose or mission of a life on earth is for humans to self-actualize, that we’re all here just trying to find our own true voice. The unique, never to be repeated essence of who we all are and to know that voice and love it and bring it forth and share it with the world. Perhaps that’s actually the purpose of life. (20:37-21:12)
  • That’s the model we’ve been indoctrinated into, but in the 21st century, we’re awakening to the truth, which is that each individual is sacred, and an organization’s value is dependent upon what it gives to its individual members, not what it takes or extracts from. (52:49-53:14)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Spasmodic Dysphonia, Leading Differently, & Strengthening Voices

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to The Impactor’s Podcast host Avery Konda about being a social impactor. Kevin’s leadership style fosters personal growth and shares the burden of leadership among everyone to ensure voices are heard. Kevin believes that employees should have more than an economic gain from being at their place of work. By utilizing Hancock Lumber as a safe and comfortable place for employees to grow and find their voices, they can begin to make impacts on the world around them.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.




CEO Kevin Hancock Lost His Voice, But Gained a New, Wildly Successful Management Style

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Monday Morning Radio host Dean Rotbart about his new book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. Kevin and Dean discuss the employee-centric model that Hancock Lumber has adopted and how Kevin came to the realization that this was the path he wanted the business to take. By prioritizing his employees and their voices and ideas, Kevin has been able to foster an environment of shared leadership throughout the company.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • They already had great solutions and they didn’t really actually need a CEO centric or a supervisory centric directive. They knew what to do, all they really needed was a bit of encouragement and a culture to trust their instinct and lead. (4:55-5:17)
  • And while that’s true today as well, we’re going about it in a very different way. We’re trying to build employee commitment to the company through corporate commitment first to the employees. (20:11-20:28)
  • So our company’s systems and processes and discipline have strengthened as a result of giving everybody a voice, not weakened because by and large, people feel like they’re valued participants in discussing, revising, and improving those systems and best practices. (30:46-31:12)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Kevin Hancock Appears on Tell Me More Podcast

Kevin Hancock joins Renee Changnon on the Tell Me More podcast to share his story about how his speech disorder set him on a path to develop new management skills and a company culture that encourages all employees to be leaders.

In the Tell Me More podcast, Renee Changnon, NRHA’s Retail Outreach Coordinator, talks to retailers across North America to learn about their careers, unique ideas and retail insights.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • ‘The customer comes first.’ I don’t actually believe that’s true. I think that people who are gonna take care of the customer, the employees who work at the company, they come first. And if the company creates a great experience for the employees, then the employees will create a best-in-class experience for the customer. (6:53-7:25)
  • But then secondly, most importantly, wouldn’t an organization where everybody led be more socially valuable. Like wouldn’t every individual take more from their experience if they were viewed as and treated as a leader. (21:48-22:05)
  • And it really was a combination of those two events, my voice disorder and then my time at Pine Ridge, that changed forever for me, the way I see the world and really in simple ways. (44:06-44:26)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




The Seventh Power and the Age of Shared Leadership

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks about his new book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey into the Business of Shared Leadership with Enterprise Radio’s host Eric Dye. They discuss his journey to Pine Ridge and how it led to a new way of leadership. Kevin is an advocate of strengthening voices of all individuals—within a company or a community—through listening, empowerment, and shared leadership.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • First, for the first time I understood what it was like to not feel fully heard. And second, at Pine Ridge I came to realize there are lots of ways to lose your voice in this world or to not feel authentically heard. And then third, which was this big leadership idea. When I started looking at history, it really hit me that throughout history, leaders had probably done more to restrict, and intimidate, and hinder others than to liberate them and empower them. And that’s really when it hit me that the partial loss of my own vice was actually a blessing in disguise and an invitation to lead differently and see if I could help create an organization in our company than perhaps beyond where everybody felt heard and everybody felt respected, trusted, empowered, and important. (02:59-04:28)
  • I think simply put, it’s look at the traditional leadership model that governs much of the planet today. It’s really an organizationally centric model where the power of decision-making and control has been pulled into the center, the corporate-cratic headquarters of the organization. And the individuals who are a part of that organization have traditionally been encouraged either overtly or covertly to sacrifice a bit of their own voice and identity for the purpose of serving the center, in a power to the center model. But if you look globally today at engagement level, people’s enthusiasm for their place of work or their confidence in their government shows statistically that their confidence was very low. And I believe that’s because we’re moving into a period in human history where increasingly individuals are wanting to serve their own vice and strengthen their own souls. But organizations are a bit behind that curve. In fact, they’re still very self- centered. To me, the idea to flip the script on the traditional model of organizational structure. And instead of collecting power in, the goal is to disburse it and push it out, and create a culture where everybody shares the responsibilities and the opportunities for leadership. (04:45-07:04)
  • A company is going to put a high priority on being profitable and having excellent customer service, of course. But to me, profitability really should be an outcome, not the goal. If an organization takes exceptional care of the people that work there, those people will figure out how to take world class care of customers, and that will produce high quality results for the company. But those corporate results are really the outcome of adding that value to the lives of the people who work at the company. (10:16-11:02)

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Straining My Vocal Chords and Strengthening the Voices of Others

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks on Awakin Call about his books Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse and The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey into the Business of Shared Leadership. He speaks about his journey to Pine Ridge as well as the healing process and lessons he learned there. He then talks about how he incorporates the tools he gathered there to implement a better structure at Hancock Lumber. In an effort to disperse power, Kevin shares the leadership role with every one of his employees. This allows them to find their true voice and the company benefitted from this greatly. He leaves the podcast by talking about how shared leadership will continue growing throughout the world.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • One of the things I’ve thought a lot about is the idea that we all come from a tribe. We’re all born into a certain moment in time, place, culture, community. And that entry point, if you will, pulls on us all to act a certain way, to be a certain type of person. But ultimately, each soul is here living a life on earth to find their own true voice, authentic to who they are, and to release it and share it with the world. (16:35-17:28)
  • One of the ideas that I really talk about in that book is the idea that awareness and connectivity, in and of itself, is a powerful act. So when I would go to Pine Ridge and come back, people would ask me what I did there. And at first, I really struggled to provide an answer. But finally I just came clean and said, I don’t really do anything there, which I don’t. I just travel around the reservation and spent time with people that I know there. And this is a place where for decades, generations, people from away have gone there to fix, save, change the people that live there. And that doesn’t work, of course, because change comes from within. And I really would see power in going there for no other reason than to be aware and connected. (32:45-33:47)
  • So at Pine Ridge, one of their core values is wisdom. And the Lakota believe that wisdom is primarily acquired through experience by living a life. And for those who have lived the longest have had the most experiences and have therefore acquired large quantities of wisdom. And elders, therefore, are highly respected within the community. If you go to a public gathering and a younger person stands up to speak, they will first ask permission to speak for the elders. And I remember a few years ago when I took my mom with me to Pine Ridge, and we had a really lovely experience. And it was fun for me to see that immediately upon arrival, she was put in front of me in a place of honor, even though she never been there, because she was the elder. And so it really made me think about how our culture, mainstream culture, could engage elders differently. (43:04-44:35)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Not 4 Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with host CinnamonMoon to discuss his book Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse. In his book, Kevin shares the driving factors that led him to his vision quest in South Dakota. He shares the details of how his life changed during and after the quest, as well as how he took the lessons he learned and applied them to his life.

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Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • And then it dawned on me probably later than it should, but after four or five trips from Maine to the reservation that I was having a bit of my own modern day Vision Quest experience. When I looked at what was happening to me, it had all the same elements of that ancient Lakota right. (26:39-26:58)
  • Yeah, no, you do. It’s so fun. I mean, the world actually becomes, I don’t want to say a simpler place, but you can see these basic simple elements everywhere you turn suddenly. It’s like the whole world lights up that way. (57:50-58:07)
  • Learning and growing does not have a finish line. It doesn’t have an end point. It doesn’t stop and there’s no winning or losing. It’s just living with a soul-based authentic intention and purpose that is pointing you in the right direction. (80:56-81:20)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Not For Sale

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Bright Side host Tekneshia about his book Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse and the journey he took that brought him to Pine Ridge. Through his own healing quest, Kevin was able to identify groups of other people who felt their voices had been muted and made it his mission to strengthen everyone’s unique voice. He took this initiative and began dispersing leadership and power to those around him.

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Not For Sale: Guest Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with The Common Sense Psychic host Phyllis King about his new book Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse. The book depicts his journey to Pine Ridge to visit the Indian Reservation and the lessons he learned along the way. One of the largest realizations on his journey involved Kevin’s leadership style. As the CEO of Hancock Lumber, Kevin was often the loudest voice in the room, but when he lost his ability to speak, he turned to others to speak more. By listening to others, he found that he could uplift their ideas and share the leadership role.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • And I happened to have read in the summer of 2012, a copy of National Geographic in which the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation was on the cover. And that article, that story, just spoke to me in a really deep, soulful way. Like every character in the story came out and hugged me. And I finished the article and I said to my wife, “I’m going to go there. I want to see what life is like, modern day life is like for the people that live there.” One of the biggest most historic, poorest, combative, disenfranchised of all the Sioux reservations on the Northern Plains. And one trip led to two, which has now been 10. And a journal I was keeping turned into a book and a story I wanted to tell. But it all came from stopping, sitting still, and listening to my own voice and wanting to express myself more broadly than just the roles I’d been assigned or taken on in my life. (08:17-09:18)
  • But what I discovered by accident changed the way I thought about leadership and changed my role. And I’ve since come to be a champion of what if we could create an organization where every voice was a leading voice, where every person led. Wouldn’t that be more powerful and dynamic and healthy than an organization where just a few people held all the cards? (20:09-20:37)
  • I suddenly had a lot more time, I was able to be more effective by doing less. Which is a really counter intuitive concept for leaders to get their head around. But I freed up time and then I was able to reinvest some of that time in my own well-being. And just over time, spending time just on me. Like I would go to Pine Ridge for five or six days at a time by myself. And while I was engaging with them and learning about them and growing fond of them and thinking about their world, I was really also just there clearing my own head and serving my own soul. And the mere act of making time to do that was extremely powerful. (20:41-21:35)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




How Spirit Quests & Indigenous Wisdom Can Shape Better Business Leadership

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to The Lucid Planet podcast host Dr. Kelly Neff about the lessons he learned at Pine Ridge that permanently altered the course of both his life and leadership style, including learning to listen more, looking inward for purpose, strengthening the voices of others, and reconstructing his entire sense of identity. Kevin’s transformation allowed him to connect with a different sense of unity within his communities and adapt his leadership style to strengthen the voices of others.

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Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Beyond 50 Radio host Daniel Davis about the lessons he learned at the Lakota Tribe at Pine Ridge and how their teachings helped him find how shared leadership enhances the lives of everyone. He shares the spiritual healing and inner peace that his quest to South Dakota brought. Kevin also speaks about how shared leadership has enhanced the lives and job satisfaction of those that work at Hancock Lumber. The power dispersal has allowed the company to flourish and grow at a rapid pace.

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Not For Sale!

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Law of Attraction Talk Radio host Jewels Johnson about his new book Not 4 Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse. He speaks about how important his journey to Pine Ridge was to finding his sense of purpose and rethinking how he leads his employees. Kevin’s quest brought him to a realization that he wants to help strengthen and enforce the voices of those who feel unheard.

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Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse

In this podcast, Kevin speaks to Big Blend Radio host Lisa about leadership and spiritual connectivity. He shares the journey he took when he lost his voice and the lessons he was able to learn while searching for peace and healing. His quest brought him to an understanding of shared leadership and power dispersal in nature. He then brought that lesson back with him to his leadership position at Hancock Lumber. At his company, he was able to observe the changes in employee satisfaction and engagement when leadership began being a daily part of every individual’s life. Kevin finishes by speaking about the unification of a global tribe as people begin finding their voices and coming together.

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Not For Sale

In this podcast, Kevin speaks to Conscious Thought With Leo host Magdalena Winkler about his new book Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse. Kevin shares his story, his journey to Pine Ridge, and the lessons he learned along the way. He dives into the idea that power is meant to be dispersed, meaning leadership should be shared among the many instead of collected at a single entity. By practicing this at Hancock Lumber, Kevin shares his findings about the company’s performance and how his employees have been able to find their own true voices.

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Spiritual Essence #216

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks with Love Maine Radio Podcast host Dr. Lisa Belisle about his journey to Pine Ridge. Kevin shares his draw to Pine Ridge and the connection he feels to the tribe there. During his quest to find peace with the loss of his voice, Kevin wanted to begin strengthening the voices of others who felt unheard. Kevin also explains the spiritual connection he feels to the land, the people, and the philosophy of the tribe.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.