1

#37 | MISSION CLARITY

“Your purpose in life is to find your purpose and give your whole heart and soul to it.”

—Buddha

Earlier this year I shared the following short message with everyone at Hancock Lumber:

Hello! I was doing some work with another company in another industry yesterday. The subject of their “mission statement” was on the agenda. The company has great values and a compelling mission, but their path to describing it was quite technical. As a result, it didn’t resonate on an emotional level.

I then experienced a moment of anxiety, hoping that I’m able to be fully human as a CEO in my communication of our shared mission.

So here I am.

For me, the first mission of our company is to help everyone feel trusted, respected, safe, valued, and heard – exactly as you are.  No change is necessary for you to be amazing.

Manufacturing lumber is important to our company, but it’s not the mission.

Logistics are also important, but they are not the core mission either.

Sharing leadership broadly, dispersing power to everyone, and respecting all voices—that’s the mission. Work should be meaningful for the people who do it.

A few moments after sending that e-mail, I began receiving messages back. Here was the first one to arrive in my in-box:

I think our mission and purpose is very clear and easy to understand for everyone. Many organizations’ missions become a long list of often difficult-to-understand statements that have little, if any, meaning to most employees. A GREAT mission is one which if you ask any randomly selected person within the organization to recite, they would be able to—ours fits that definition.

* * *

The mission an enterprise prioritizes matters, because most organizations achieve what they focus on. If a company wants to create a different set of outcomes, they may only need to examine what they are consistently prioritizing.

Additionally, I don’t believe in a singular corporate mission. A world-class company is highly dynamic and will create benefits that advance society on multiple levels. At Hancock Lumber, for example, we expect to be highly valuable to not just employees but also to customers, suppliers, stockholders, and the communities we serve.  We aspire to positively impact our industry, our state, and the nation—even humanity as a whole. That’s a whole lot of mission.

So the real question becomes, where is the critical first focal point that, when ignited, will fuel and drive value creation for the whole? This is the foundational mission, the one that paves the way for all the others. It’s the point on the fly-wheel where the energy must be applied.  For us that’s the employee experience.  All other experiences, we believe, are derived from that one.

A great mission must be personally and immediately actionable, accessible to everyone. No complex training is required. Magic missions are intuitive. The moment you meet one, you know what to do—and what not to do. When you have a mission worthy of pursuing, everybody wins, and the victory reverberates far beyond the boundaries of the company.

* * *

Here are some traditional corporate mission statements:

  • Our mission is to maximize shareholder value.
  • Our mission is to achieve peak production efficiency.
  • Our mission is to grow and become the number-one supplier in our market.
  • Our mission is to sacrifice whatever is required in service to our customers.

The problem with each of these objectives is that the benefits of achieving them can feel as though they are bypassing the people doing the work.  Workers should work first for their own joy, growth, advancement, challenge, fun, and financial benefit.  That’s a great set of goals and it’s not just ok, but actually desirable to pursue them.  Work should fill your own cup and when it does your performance will create great value for others.

Advancement of self should be front and center in any foundational mission. Shareholder value, corporate productivity, revenue growth, and customer care are all important but as the outcomes of a higher calling.

Humanity is always ultimately advanced on a local level, where humans reside. The place of work should be first and foremost for the humans that work there.  When the employees soar everyone is advanced.

Most companies get exactly what they ask for.

What’s yours asking for?

“I spend a tremendous amount of time carefully choosing the roles I wish to play so that I can run from the role I was born to play.”

—Craig Lounsbrough

 

______

Thank you for considering my thoughts. In return I honor yours. Every voice matters. Nestled between our differences lies our future.

______

This is the thirty-seventh post in a series of short essays to be posted by Kevin to www.thebusinessofsharedleadership.com in 2021. Kevin is dedicating these writings in honor of Black Elk, the Oglala Sioux holy man who was escorted as a child on a sacred vision quest by the 48 horses of the four directions to visit the six Grandfathers. My horses, prancing they are coming. They will dance; may you behold them. On that journey Black Elk understood the sacred power that dwelled within him and lives within us all. He also recognized that this power could be used for good or bad. Intentional we must be about the path we walk. To invite others to join The Business of Shared Leadership and receive these posts, just pass this link along. The more who join, the deeper the energy field of engagement will become! Thank you!




#5 | ORIGINS

2021 IDEA-SHARING ADVENTURE SERIES BY KEVIN HANCOCK

Bureaucracy and social harmony are inversely proportionate to each other.”

Leon Trotsky

What are the origins of bureaucracy?

How did “power” historically become centralized in command-and-control hierarchies?

How did certain groups come to exert a defining influence over others?

The answer, at its most fundamental level, is through stories backed by force and force justified through stories.

Slavery was a story backed by force. The subjugation of indigenous peoples across the Americas was also a story backed by force. The September 11, 2001, attack on the twin towers of the World Trade Center is another story backed by force. A traditionally male-dominated society was, and is, a story backed by force. In all cases a narrative defining the superiority of one group and the inferiority of another is required in order to “justify” the inhumane actions required to establish and maintain dominance.

Both the Roman emperors and the European monarchs of the early and Middle Ages reigned on the basis of a story known as the “divine right of kings.” This tale, which became accepted as doctrine and was reinforced by the Church, stated that kings ruled with the backing of heavenly powers.

“The state of monarchy is the supremest thing upon Earth,
for the kings are not only God’s lieutenants upon Earth and sit upon God’s throne,
but even by God himself they are called Gods.”

—James I of England (1610)

Across the Western world this divine right was conveyed upon kings by another co-conspiring hierarchy, the Church.

“Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers.
For there is no power but of God: the powers that are ordained of God.
Whoever, therefore, resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God:
and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation.”

—Romans 13

All of this presumes a God who takes sides and is vengeful against those who do not follow “his” word.

In the quest to be fully conscious it’s interesting to note that the dominant conclusion of Islam, Christianity, and Judaism is of a hierarchical God who reigns from above, sends commandments below, and judges all. While this may be the case, it’s not the only interpretation. It does, however, conveniently set a precedent for human organizations to follow.

Indoctrination is defined as “the process of teaching a person or group to accept a set of beliefs uncritically.” The key word here is “uncritically.” These beliefs must become so deeply rooted over time that they exist largely unquestioned.

European Americans of the nineteenth century convinced themselves that native peoples were less-worthy humans and therefore exploitable. Southern plantation owners built their society upon the same narrative about people who were black. Slavery and reservations were actually considered “good” and “necessary” for the people subjected to them.

These are dramatic examples of hierarchies established by stories and force, but the model also manifests in more-subtle ways. The place of work, for example, has traditionally been organized around a similar pattern, a ladder of importance and control. The owner and the interests of the business are paramount. The employees, meanwhile, are subservient to the company and expected to follow the instructions that flow down from above.

It can be numbing to consciously confront the origins of our dominant leadership models. It gives me pause to even type these words. I am a white male CEO of a family business. My position in this world came in part through inheritance, as was true of my dad, his dad, and beyond, for six generations. Traveling centuries back in time, a piece of my opportunity emanated from the divine right of kings. Reconciling this and deciding what to do about it has become a priority for me.

In the end, I can’t change when and where I was born—I do have a company and I am leading it—but I can try to change how that company engages with others and expand the mission it exists to serve.

This is what brings me to champion the concepts of shared leadership, redistributed power, respect for all voices, and the creation of employee-centric companies that prioritize the people who work there.

Across human history, power has been centralized. But, like anything that travels in a circle, it can be given back. The fundamental building block of personal power is self-worth—the internal knowing that you are sacred. Today’s “kings” must honor this truth by re-dispersing their power.

The first step in creating a new and more-collaborative model for leadership is the uncomfortable task of acknowledging the old one.

“Bureaucracy is the art of making the possible impossible.”

Javier Salcedo

* * *
Thank you for considering my thoughts. In return I honor yours. Every voice matters. Between our differences lies our future.

____________________

This is the fifth in a series of short essays to be posted by Kevin to www.thebusinessofsharedleadership.com in 2021. Kevin is dedicating these writings in honor of Black Elk, the Oglala Sioux holy man who was escorted as a child on a sacred vision quest by the 48 horses of the four directions to visit the six Grandfathers. My horses, prancing they are coming. They will dance; may you behold them. On that journey Black Elk understood the sacred power that dwelled within him and lives within us all. He also recognized that this power could be used for good or bad. Intentional we must be about the path we walk. To invite others to join The Business of Shared Leadership and receive these posts, just pass this link along. The more who join, the deeper the energy field of engagement will become! Thank you!



#3 | STAYING ON MISSION IN A CHAOTIC WORLD

2021 IDEA-SHARING ADVENTURE SERIES BY KEVIN HANCOCK

In the first decades of the twenty-first century, three exceptional yet unforeseen events altered humanity’s course.

On the morning of September 11, 2001, al-Qaeda militants hijacked four airplanes. Within hours the twin towers of the World Trade Center would fall and a global war would commence. In 2008, subprime borrowers began defaulting on their home mortgages, initiating a financial crisis that nearly collapsed the entire global banking system. In late 2019, a small group of shoppers at a wet market in Wuhan, China, became infected with a virus of unknown origins. Within a hundred days, nearly every nation on Earth was partially paralyzed by gathering restrictions and lockdowns.

In times of such epic social disruptions, how do we stay focused on our personal mission and voice? How do we support the whole while advancing our sense of self?

Maintaining one’s personal energy in a sea of social chaos may be the essential skill of our time.

Every voice is unique by design. The long arc of humanity is ultimately the sum of its individual parts. What society needs most from us is for our never-to-be-repeated voices to be unfurled and broadly shared. We change the world one human at a time.

I was sensitized to the importance of authentic voice and personal mission by yet another combination of unexpected events. In 2010, I began to have trouble speaking. I was the CEO of one of America’s oldest family businesses, and our lumber company was reeling from the stress of the economic crisis when my voice failed me. Months later I was diagnosed with a rare neurological disorder called “spasmodic dysphonia” (SD). Suddenly, I had to develop a new strategy for leading that did not include lots of talking.

Two years later, I began traveling from Maine to the remote Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota (a place I have now visited over twenty times). There I encountered an entire community that did not feel fully heard.

These two events combined to produce a series of personal learnings. First, I understood what it was like to not feel fully heard. Second, I realized there are lots of ways for people to lose their voice in this world. Third, I began to wonder if the very purpose of a human life on Earth is to self-actualize.

Unfortunately, across the centuries many leaders have done more to restrict the voices of others than to liberate them.

That’s when my personal calling became clear. The partial loss of my own voice was an invitation to disperse power, share leadership, and strengthen the voices of others. I have stayed focused on this mission ever since, despite the distractions of the larger world.

Influencing the world is an inside job. You have a mission and that mission matters. Only you can pursue it. Humanity needs you to be you and carry on. With this approach the world morphs into a different place. It slows down, gains clarity, and localizes.

The history-altering events described at the beginning of this essay share a single root cause: Humanity is moving too fast to acquire more. Our pace—you might call it our “race”—is unsustainable. In the Western world’s zeal to conquer and colonize we find the underpinnings of radical Islamic instability and terror. The subprime mortgage market collapse was also the result of impatience and excess on all sides. Speed was equally responsible for accelerating the global pandemic. How many customers can be crammed into an airplane, a stadium, a bar? Bigger, better, more. We all drank the Kool-Aid and now here we are.

Once we recognize the cause of our chaos, we can hone in on the cure. The world as seen on TV manifests as overwhelming. Only by returning to what lies within us and beside us can we clear the skies. Staying on your mission is the remedy to the turmoil that plagues our modern world. So for the love of humanity, follow your voice. Walk your path. Speak your truth.

If excessive pace with vague purpose is the problem, controlling your pace and clarifying your purpose is the cure.

(Note: A longer version of this essay was first published in 2020 as part of the international bestseller “Bright Spots: Motivation and Inspiration to Light Your Path in a Changing Worldby Cathy Davis. This book—a collection of essays written by forty authors from around the world, including Kevin, in response to the events of 2020—is available on Amazon, or wherever books are sold.)

* * *
Thank you for considering my thoughts. In return I honor yours. Every voice matters. Between our differences lies our future.

____________________

This is the third in a series of short essays to be posted by Kevin to www.thebusinessofsharedleadership.com in 2021. Kevin is dedicating these writings in honor of Black Elk, the Oglala Sioux holy man who was escorted as a child on a sacred vision quest by the 48 horses of the four directions to visit the six Grandfathers. My horses, prancing they are coming. They will dance; may you behold them. On that journey Black Elk understood the sacred power that dwelled within him and lives within us all. He also recognized that this power could be used for good or bad. Intentional we must be about the path we walk. To invite others to join The Business of Shared Leadership and receive these posts, just pass this link along. The more who join, the deeper the energy field of engagement will become! Thank you!



Dispersing Power and Strengthening the Voices of Others

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Human Capital Innovations host Jonathan H. Westover, PhD about his new book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. They discuss how the work culture Kevin has fostered at Hancock Lumber has created an environment where every voice is heard, trusted, and respected. By doing so, this empowers the voices of others and creates a heightened level of employee engagement and job satisfaction. Kevin also talks about how this can be used in any community setting, and discusses how it would change the future to see more areas where everybody leads.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • In nature, power is dispersed. That secret sauce, that sacred energy of the universe, actually lives in all its parts and pieces. And humans, w ho are apart of nature not separate from it, I believe ultimately want to organize in this way. And in the 21st century, in the query and age, I think this is where you see the disconnect. So people are awakening to their own sacred power as individuals. But institutions are still often locked in this past-based approach to leadership, which is about collecting power to the center, having a few speak for the many, and taking a bureaucratic approach to get things done. And while that model might have been the dominant model for centuries looking backward, I do not believe it’s going to be the dominant model going forward. (08:55-10:08)
  • So if work becomes a place where everyone can kind of self-actualize, can test their skills, can come to know their own identity and can feel safe doing so, then work starts to become a really important social tool, not just an economic tool. I’ve really, to take that one step further, come to think very differently about the mission or purpose of work. I think that the economic results are an important outcome. Outcome, of a higher calling. And I think that higher calling is that work should be meaningful to the people who do it. (13:36-14:28)
  • But I had a gentlemen show me one day when I was at Pine Ridge, that the center of the wheel, those who know the old ways, he told me, know that seventh power also exists. And that seventh power is you. It’s me. It’s the individual human spirit. Which is of nature, of the universe, of the sacred spirit. However you want to think about it. And that every individual is a piece of the divine. So the real task in social justice and in rethinking organizational excellence, is about giving away from the bureaucracy, getting away from the monolith, getting away from the empire, and putting the focus back on the individual and helping individuals understand and tap into their own power.(28:34-29:39)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




Guy’s Guy Radio: Marc Cameron & Kevin Hancock

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Guy’s Guy Radio host Robert Manni about his newest book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership. They discuss Kevin’s journey and how he came to find the philosophy that everybody should lead. At Hancock Lumber, Kevin works to create a safe and respectful environment for everyone to discuss their thoughts and lead the team to solutions. This not only increases the confidence in the decision-making process, but it also allows the leadership responsibilities to be spread across many minds and many people. Listening to others allows them to find their authentic voice, which leads to higher employee engagement and job satisfaction levels.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Here are a few highlights from the podcast (click here for the full transcription):

  • And that’s what I really got excited about. The idea within our own company of creating a culture that gave everybody a voice and made it safe for everyone to say what they actually thought, and to share the responsibility for speaking for the company – because I couldn’t do it myself – and for leading the company. (39:10-39:39)
  • It’s a notion that essentially everyone is capable of leading, and everyone has a voice that’s worth being heard. And that the culture is really what separates organizations. Cultures either collect power to the center and put it in the hands of the few, or those cultures disperse power and strengthen the voices of others. (40:57-41:38)
  • Well, I think the one big thought is to make the employee experience a top priority. That sounds simple, but it’s powerful. Corporations are good at whatever they choose to focus on. So really, the simple act of making the employee experience a top corporate priority, will had a huge impact on improving the employee experience. (43:57-44:29)

Click here to download a PDF of the transcription.




7 Signs That Say You Have the Mindset of a Great Leader

Centralized power and decision-making control is out. Shared leadership is in.

To read the full article, click here.



What is Shared Leadership and What Can It Bring Your Business

In this video, Kevin Hancock speaks with Small Atlanta Business Show host Jim Fitzpatrick about his new book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey into the Business of Shared Leadership. They discuss his background and the journey to Pine Ridge. During his time there, Kevin came to the conclusion that in nature power is dispersed. He took the lessons he learned there and brought this shared leadership model to Hancock Lumber.

“I think that a company will perform better when everybody is leading than when just a few hold the decision making responsibility in the center. But my real interest in dispersing power and sharing leadership is bigger than business. It’s about helping every human being self actualize, and come into their own voice, and be confident with and comfortable with their own identity and perspective.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to watch the full video.




Culture Makes the Difference

In this article, Kevin Hancock writes about how company culture plays a significant role in differentiating one business from another. To Kevin, culture is fostered heavily by who controls the power of the entity. If the power is consolidated at the top, employees may begin to feel unheard and easily replaced. In cultures where leadership and power is dispersed, employees begin finding their true voice and feel a higher level of engagement and satisfaction.

“Work should serve the people who do it in more than just economic ways. Work should be a place where humans flourish—where people learn, lead, and grow. If the employees of a company have an exceptional experience, they will ensure that customers thrive and will protect and grow their company with loyalty and pride.” – Kevin Hancock

Click here to read the full article.




A Butt-Kicking Project to Overcome the Drain of Talkative Leadership

This article highlights the downfalls that talkative leaders often use to justify their conversation monopoly and the negative impacts it can have on culture and engagement. It also gives an exercise that leaders can partake in to find out how often they take over entire conversations. Kevin Hancock’s story is shared through a video interview about how losing his voice changed his entire leadership style.

To read the full article and watch the interview, click here.




Putting Work Back In It’s Place

In this article, Kevin Hancock writes about the importance of having a proper work/life balance. He highlights the difficulties of keeping work weeks to forty hours in the manufacturing industry, but admits there is no denying the benefits of having a balanced life.

“Today I encourage all of the 525 people in our company to expand their lives beyond work and to invest more energy in pursuits that spark their hearts. While being successful at our jobs is essential for a healthy society, life is bigger than work. Today’s complex world needs CEOs who see the big picture of a balanced life, and use advancements at the workplace to free human capacity, not consume it.” – Kevin Hancock

To read the full article, click here.




How Saying Less Can Empower Others to Say More

In this article, Kevin Hancock writes about how journey to finding that by saying less, he is empowering others to speak more. By sharing the leadership responsibility with many, instead of consolidating in one place, Kevin has seen tremendous growth in those around him and the business he runs, Hancock Lumber. Once employees became engaged and felt more confidence, they began flourishing. Kevin writes that this is the path for the future, not only for Hancock Lumber, but one he hopes will spread to other communities as well.

Click here to read the full article.




The Age of Localism

In this article, Kevin Hancock speaks about shared leadership, employee engagement, and employee-centric company structures.

“Humans will always benefit from banding together to create value and solve problems. But institutions will need to alter the ways they engage with the world. Take corporations, for example, where employees have historically existed to serve the company. This self-centered model is in decline. It will be replaced by a new corporate relationship in which the company understands that its real purpose is to be valuable and meaningful to the people who work there. I call this reoriented corporation an ’employee-centric company.'” – Kevin Hancock

To read the full article, click here.




True Profitability and Productivity Come From Striving for a Bigger Social Goal

This article is an excerpt from Kevin Hancock’s new book The Seventh Power: One CEO’s Journey Into the Business of Shared Leadership.

“At Hancock Lumber, we grow trees, but that is not our core objective. We make lumber, but that is not our primary purpose. We manage logistics, but that is not our most important task. Our one big goal is to add value to the lives of the people who work at Hancock Lumber. Work should add more than just economic value to the lives of the people who operate our company.” – Kevin Hancock

To read the full article, click here.




5 Clear Signs You’re Not An Authentic Leader

In the article, Kevin Hancock’s core belief that leaders should listen more than speak is highlighted as an important indicator of being an authentic leader. Authentic leaders are naturally those who disperse and share leadership with those around them. Author Erin Hatzikostas says that when you share leadership and listen to others, “you’ll be amazed at how smart other people are.”

To read the full article, click here.




Spasmodic Dysphonia, Leading Differently, & Strengthening Voices

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to The Impactor’s Podcast host Avery Konda about being a social impactor. Kevin’s leadership style fosters personal growth and shares the burden of leadership among everyone to ensure voices are heard. Kevin believes that employees should have more than an economic gain from being at their place of work. By utilizing Hancock Lumber as a safe and comfortable place for employees to grow and find their voices, they can begin to make impacts on the world around them.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.




The Business of Shared Leadership – A CEO’s Quest to Disperse Power

In this TEDx Talk, Kevin Hancock speaks about employee engagement and how this is affected by leadership style. In workplaces where employees do not feel heard, understood, or able to lead, they often become disengaged with the work they are performing. It leads to job dissatisfaction and eventually, employee turnover. When employees are able to share the leadership role and are truly heard by those around them, they are able to grow.

“The purpose of [Hancock Lumber] is to add value to the lives of the people who work there, in more than just economic ways.”  – Kevin Hancock

Click here to watch the full video.




Turning Your Business Into Something Extraordinary

Turn Your Business into Something Extraordinary

In these two videos, Kevin Hancock speaks about his journey to finding dispersed power. He shares with the audience how he ended up visiting Pine Ridge and befriending the Indian tribe living there. He was able to connect with them since they felt their voices had been lost as well. Kevin found that his new mission was to strengthen the voices of others and use that strength to disperse power.

Kevin also brings these lessons and ideas to the workplace in an effort to share leadership. By sharing power, employees feel more job satisfaction, more voices and ideas are heard, and the workload becomes lessened for all involved. He concludes the video by sharing seven lessons for new leadership.

Click here to watch part 1 of the video.

Click here to watch part 2 of the video.




Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse

In this podcast, Kevin Hancock speaks to Beyond 50 Radio host Daniel Davis about the lessons he learned at the Lakota Tribe at Pine Ridge and how their teachings helped him find how shared leadership enhances the lives of everyone. He shares the spiritual healing and inner peace that his quest to South Dakota brought. Kevin also speaks about how shared leadership has enhanced the lives and job satisfaction of those that work at Hancock Lumber. The power dispersal has allowed the company to flourish and grow at a rapid pace.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.




Strengthening the Voices of Others

In this article, Kevin Hancock shares his story about losing his voice and how his leadership style adapted to this major obstacle. By listening more to others, Kevin is able to preserve his voice and create a new employee-centric culture at Hancock Lumber.

“Leadership is about doing less, not more. It is about restraint. It is about holding the power but not using it. It’s about listening without judging or correcting. It is about being connected and aware of how others feel.” – Kevin Hancock

To read the full article, click here.




Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse

In this podcast, Kevin speaks to Big Blend Radio host Lisa about leadership and spiritual connectivity. He shares the journey he took when he lost his voice and the lessons he was able to learn while searching for peace and healing. His quest brought him to an understanding of shared leadership and power dispersal in nature. He then brought that lesson back with him to his leadership position at Hancock Lumber. At his company, he was able to observe the changes in employee satisfaction and engagement when leadership began being a daily part of every individual’s life. Kevin finishes by speaking about the unification of a global tribe as people begin finding their voices and coming together.

Click here to listen to the full podcast.




Not For Sale

In this podcast, Kevin speaks to Conscious Thought With Leo host Magdalena Winkler about his new book Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse. Kevin shares his story, his journey to Pine Ridge, and the lessons he learned along the way. He dives into the idea that power is meant to be dispersed, meaning leadership should be shared among the many instead of collected at a single entity. By practicing this at Hancock Lumber, Kevin shares his findings about the company’s performance and how his employees have been able to find their own true voices.

Click here to listen to the podcast.




Leading by Listening

In this article, Kevin Hancock is interviewed about his journey to finding a new leadership style by listening more to others. Kevin’s new management initiative helps bring Hancock Lumber to new highs, by creating a lean structure and maximizing employee engagement. They also talk about his new book, Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse.

To read the full article, click here.




Bethel Sawmill – Book Day!

I spent the day at our sawmill in Bethel, Maine yesterday.  At the end of the work day, I gave each of the 103 people who work there a copy of my book, NOT FOR SALE – Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse!

The day before I had personalized each book…took almost 3 hours!

I wanted to do that as a show of respect.  I never want people at Hancock Lumber to feel like they are only wanted for their physical work.  I want every person to feel important for their ideas and opinions.  That’s really what my book stands for…strengthening voices…at home and at Pine Ridge!